Does Video Exist Of Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-Point Game?

Golden State Warriors  v Philadelphia 76ers

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — The greatest single-game scoring performance in NBA history is Wilt Chamberlain‘s 100-point night, when the Philadelphia Warriors defeated the New York Knicks, 169-147, in a game played in Hershey, PA. But like many of the older bits of NBA history, this game exists only on paper — there was no video recorded of Wilt’s unbelievable night.

Or was there? In an interview this weekend with The 700 Level, University of Memphis coach Josh Pastner mentioned some incredible details. Pastner noted that his father, Hal, apparently video taped Wilt’s historic night…

“My father was the ball boy for the 76ers for many, many years, and he and Wilt Chamberlain were very close. … And Wilt Chamberlain always felt somebody was trying to get him on timeouts with assassination through drinking. And he drank 7-Up or Sprite, one of the two. And my dad always had to taste it before Wilt — He made my father drink it before [he] would taste it to make sure my dad didn’t conk out. But Wilt took care of my father. They always went around. Like my dad said, he never had a front seat; Wilt sat in the back when he was driving because his legs were so long.

“And in fact, my father and his father taped the game reel-to-reel in the second quarter when it was in Hershey, Pennsylvania in the 100-point game. They started when he had like 30-something; they thought it was going to be a special night. They gave it to Wilt — the 100-point game — and Wilt gave it back to my dad and my dad’s dad. He gave it back to them, they boxed it up, and he’s still trying to find it. He’s got all kinds of boxes, and he doesn’t know if he lost it. He’s trying to find the sucker. … I mean he’s got jerseys of Wilt, pictures.”

Until his Dad finds the tape, though, we’re still missing a big chunk of NBA history.

(via TNLP)


VIDEO: NBA TV’s ‘Wilt 100′ examines the truths and mysteries behind Wilt Chamberlain’s 100-point game

24 Comments

  1. hole says:

    where’s the video? thanks for wasting my time…

  2. Rod Miller says:

    I played high school basketball in Wilt’s time in high school but never saw Wilt the Stilt in person. IMHO, LeBron James is deja vu all over again as Berra would day. Both were on the national scene as teenagers and destined for greatness though I feel Chamberlain was the all time best. No way is LeBron scoring 100 (if he wanted to) on all two point shots. Had Pistol Pete Maravich been on a hand selected team (like LeBron pulled off), Maravich might have pulled off a 100 point game. Just a few thoughts from a senior citizen with great memories of times gone by …

    • asdf says:

      you cant even compare basketball in wilt`s era to basketball in this era, wilt was much bigger than anyone else, nobody could match up against him.,

    • Tony C says:

      I got news for you buddy. All teams are hand selected. I think what you’re trying to say is this… So long as the Owners hand pick the teams its okay, but when a player decides to take ownership of himself and where he ends up, that’s a no no in your booki. You’re quite Pathetic!

  3. TTKIN says:

    As far as Im concerned, until the video surfaces, this is just a guy trying to get his name in the papers.

  4. dustydreamnz says:

    Top player no doubt but the league is far stronger today.

    • jake says:

      If you’re talking about physical strength, Wilt was at or over 300 pounds most of his career. I think he would have no trouble man-handling anyone in the league today.
      I definitely see Wilt Chamberlain as the best player to ever play in the NBA. LeBron James is almost certainly the most well-rounded player to play in the NBA, but I just don’t think he’s as dominant as Wilt Chamberlain was.

  5. Ryan says:

    I always look at players in 2-3 separate eras, it use to be pre and post NBA-ABA merger, but now I split them in 3, and the post merger ends around the time David Stern took control. The Stern Era, is what I call modern era of basketball, and that time in between merger and then, I just consider pre-modern era.

    Which means I don’t consider things equally as I compare players performances in different eras. It is also why I never mix Kareem and Wilt when comparing them to guys like Jordan, Malone, and Kobe, guys who did what they did completely in the “modern era”.

    Still, 100 points is cool, just like Kobe’s 81, Robinson’s 71, Jordan’s 69, Malone’s 61 and Shaq’s 61.

    Of course it is EPIC, even though he had 48 minutes, but after much thought and consideration it isn’t exactly how I thought after looking at details. I mean what kind of defense and PACE is used when the final score is 169-147?! That sounds like pure entertainment to me like a Globetrotter game, but done in 1962.

    Karl Malone did his in 1990, with only 33 minutes and 26 attempts, which was in a real game in modern era, just pure domination and held them to less than 100, that is real EPIC!!! Even Kobe played a normal 41:56 minutes, and I consider what he did way more impressive than anybody cause he didn’t let them score about 150 points. If you let someone score 147 points on you, your easily going to have plenty of time to get 63 attempts along with 32 FTA in your 48 minutes of play. 48 minutes to shoot 63 shots is like 1-2 shots per minute, with 16 of them being fouled on.

    When I think of that in my head, I just see two teams running back and forth, back and forth, which is nothing like basketball in modern era, where guys like Kobe worked for all their shots, and Malone working for most of his, but he was actually using a system that didn’t involve “just let me make my own shot”.

  6. Ryan says:

    Of course it is EPIC, even though he had 48 minutes, but after much thought and consideration it isn’t exactly how I thought after looking at details. I mean what kind of defense and PACE is used when the final score is 169-147?! That sounds like pure entertainment to me like a Globetrotter game, but done in 1962.

    Karl Malone did his in 1990, with only 33 minutes and 26 attempts, which was in a real game in modern era, just pure domination and held them to less than 100, that is real EPIC!!! Even Kobe played a normal 41:56 minutes, and I consider what he did way more impressive than anybody cause he didn’t let them score about 150 points. If you let someone score 147 points on you, your easily going to have plenty of time to get 63 attempts along with 32 FTA in your 48 minutes of play. 48 minutes to shoot 63 shots is like 1-2 shots per minute, with 16 of them being fouled on.

    When I think of that in my head, I just see two teams running back and forth, back and forth, which is nothing like basketball in modern era, where guys like Kobe worked for all their shots, and Malone working for most of his, but he was actually using a system that didn’t involve “just let me make my own shot”.

  7. davis says:

    if you put SHAQ, HAKEEM, JABBAR and YAO on his (wilt) era they might scored 200 points, i can compare wilt only to david robinson in terms of skills, who got height and speed, imagine to put david robinson on wilt’s time when most of his guards are 6″8 centers, you just have to throw the ball in the air on the low post, and he will dunk it. Now every team got atleast 2-3 7 feet above fast centers in every team that’s the different

  8. Brandon says:

    Dwight may have a little chance of matching up with wilt

  9. A voice of reason says:

    NBA.com are forever promoting this game. Chamerlain though played in an era where big men where generally low in calibre and he was so much bigger than everyone else. He regularly played against teams whose largest player(s) were 4 or 5 inches shorter than him and 50-60 pounds lighter than him (based on his listing of 275lbs, but it is commonly thought he was somewhat heavier) so his advantage was huge. Today when two guys are matched up with a size difference of half that commentators will talk about the disadvantage the smaller player has. Chamerlains opposite number in this game was 6’8″ and 215lbs so obviously a huge advantage for Chamerlain and if a video of the game surfaces people will see that. Really his stats make him look much better than he really was because of his huge size advantage and the way the game was then.

  10. WIlliam says:

    If they had this video, wouldn’t it be a priority to find it?

  11. AnnoYouLater says:

    oh men Wilt seemed like a really big Douchebag…

  12. None of the above says:

    With the huge size advantage this guy had he shouldn’t have been on the court if he couldn’t dominate. A 7’1″ 300lb player scores 100 against a 6’8″ 215lb player. It’s not that big a deal especially with a huge amount of shots. Chamberlain wasn’t the best player in his era let alone beyond that (that accolade would probably go to Oscar Robertson) despite him often telling people how wonderful he thought he was. Any decent 7 footer could have dominated then simply because nobody would have been big enough to do anything about them.

    • raymon says:

      so wrong bro you know manute bol was in that era too and he was a scrub, go watch some stuff about wilt he had skill, as a 35 year old he went up against kareem and is the only one who every really blocked the sky hook consistently, he would easily dominate the bigs of today he is huge and athletic. he ran a 4-5 a 4-5!!! if it wasnt for bill russel and his team full of hall of famers he would have alot more rings

  13. None of the above says:

    With the huge size advantage Chamerlain had over everyone he shouldn’t have been on the court if he couldn’t dominate. He at 7’1″ and around 300 pounds scores 100 against a 6’8″ 215 pound opponent with a very large amount of shots – it’s not that big a deal. Any decent 7 footer could have dominated in that era because nobody would have been big enough to stop them which is exactly why he dominated – not because he was this great player he liked to think and tell everyone he was. If such a video exists (why it’s taken this long who knows!) do his fans want the myth broken by seeing him constantly scoring on a guys that look like midgets by comparison?

  14. The game has changed, People have gotten bigger, faster, stronger, the game today is way different then it was back then. Look at Jerry West, was not the fastest guy but a amazing shooters and could find his teammates anywhere on the floor. What if a player like Russel Westbrook guarded him though, fast, great hands, he would probably do a lot more damage then Jerry West. The game has changed because of all the ways of training have changed. Back in the day 6’9 was a average center and they weighed maybe 235. Today you have players that are 7 feet tall and are almost 275 pounds. Well there is still some centers that do good for there size, for example, Dwight Howard, 6’10 and plays like a 7 footer because he so explosive and strong. The game has changed so much we cannot judge weather a play would be better then a historic player. Unless the play against each other there is no possible way of telling who is better, or how the game has changed.

  15. Sankt Pauli says:

    Russell, Thurmond, Pettit, Bellamy, Wayne Embry, later he played Abdul Jabbar, Wes Unseld…I think that’s a strong enough opposition.

  16. ollie boombayay says:

    Come on Lang! “Video tape” won’t surface because it wasn’t invented. However I have no doubt in my mind that Coach Pastner is telling the truth and that there is film footage of this game in existence. The radio broadcast didn’t even surface until 1988 and that had to be pieced together from 2nd hand recordings.

    Those of you who try to disclaim this feat simply need to watch other footage of Wilt to see that he did indeed have skills to go along with his size. All centers use their size to their advantage. The Knicks tried to stop Wilt from breaking the scoring record by fouling him because he sucked at free throws, but it didn’t work (28 for 32). They even tried the bush league tactic of fouling his teammates so he wouldn’t get points, but that didn’t work either. It was just the perfect storm of a great player with great teammates who wanted to see a record broken vs. a last place team.