Posts Tagged ‘Grant Hill’

Kobe Bryant Plays Beethoven

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Earlier this season, Kobe Bryant tweeted a photo of himself sitting at a piano, and noted that Beethoven’s “Moonlight Sonata” was useful as a relaxation agent…

A few days later, Kobe posted a quick video of himself playing a snippet of the song…


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Now a new ad from Lenovo completes the progression, as Kobe and a string ensemble play the entire thing. All we need now is Kobe and Grant Hill in a dueling pianos video.
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(via PBT)

Grant Hill And Wife Cover Frank Ocean’s “Thinkin’ Bout You”

ALL BALL NERVE CENTERGrant Hill may have recently retired, but he’s not going anywhere. In the meantime, his wife is apparently making him do stuff around the house. The difference here is that Grant Hill’s wife is the Grammy-nominated singer Tamia. Instead of taking out the trash or changing lightbulbs, Tamia asked Grant to play a succession of minor chords while she sang Frank Ocean‘s “Thinkin’ Bout You”…
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(via Grantland)

Grant Hill Was Quite Good As A Piston

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By Jeff Case

It was only a week or so ago that Grant Hill announced to the Inside The NBA crew that he was hanging up the Filas (of sorts) and calling it a career after 19 seasons in the NBA. In case you missed it, the fine folks in our video department did a great retrospective on Mr. Hill’s career (which you can see below). The video puts a respectful bow on the career of Hill, who was the No. 3 pick of the 1994 Draft and rose to NBA stardom almost overnight.

But what some of you younger readers (or even the older ones) might have missed is just how nasty of a dunker and overall player Hill was during the peak of his athletic powers with the Detroit Pistons. Luckily, the fine folks over at Pistons.com have compiled the 10 best plays from Hill’s days in the Motor City and it is an absolute must-watch.

I think Alonzo Mourning is still hurting from that posterizer and Gheorge Muresan is still wondering what he ever did to deserve so much punishment …

It’s So Hard To Say Goodbye, Says Brad Miller

by Micah Hart

With the conclusion of the NBA’s regular season, it means the end of the road for many basketball players. Some will lose their spots to rookies, some will take deals in Europe that might provide more money or stability, and for a few lucky ones, they will go out on their own terms after long and productive careers. Brad Miller is one of those players. Miller has said he will retire after the season, which meant when he checked out of the Timberwolves game against the Nuggets tonight with 5:04 left in the fourth quarter, he was checking out for good. At least he got one last three-pointer to drop before the final curtain:



I can only imagine the emotion of a moment like that, when you are forced to give up the one thing that has been a constant in your life since you were a small child. It’s no wonder we see so many athletes get choked up in these environs.

Congrats on a wonderful career Brad, and congrats as well to other NBA veterans who have likely played their last games, including Ben Wallace, who has said he will call it quits, and perhaps others like Grant Hill, Jason Kidd, or Kurt Thomas, who might choose the same when all is said and done. I’d include Juwan Howard as well, but he appears to be shooting for Jamie Moyer territory at this point.

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Three For All: Phoenix Suns II

by Micah Hart



As everyone knows by now, the compressed NBA schedule will force every team to play three games in three nights at least one this season (42 times in total). With only 66 games to stake a claim to a playoff spot or seed, how teams perform during these killer slates could have a large impact on how their seasons turn out.

With that in mind, we’re going to keep track of each of the 42 three-plays to see which teams take advantage and which teams fall apart. Up next, the Phoenix Suns, who played three straight from Mar. 14-16.

The Phoenix Suns’ season can pretty easily be summed up by their two entries in the three for all challenge. In their first foray back in February, Phoenix went winless, part of a four-game skid that saw the team fall a season-worst seven games under .500 after a loss to the Lakers on Feb. 17.

That game must have shook something loose in the desert, because ever since the Suns have been scorching, winning 10 of 13 games and moving all the way back to .500 on the season at the culmination of their second threeplay:

Game 1: Suns 120, Jazz 111 – Part of the reason for the Suns’ success has been the production the team has been getting from up and down the roster. To wit: Channing Frye dropped a season-high 26 points (with nine rebounds), Marcin Gortat had 25, and Jared Dudley had 21 in the win over the Jazz. 1 point

Game 2: Suns 91, Clippers 87 - Home win over the Jazz? Not bad, but nothing special. Road win over the Clippers? Now that’s a nice win, despite how weird it makes me feel to write that sentence. Oh, and did I mention they did it without Grant Hill and Steve Nash, who picked up DNP-OMs (Did Not Play – Old Men)? Seriously. Sebastian Telfair started this game. Crazy season indeed. 4 points (3 for win, 1 for road)

Game 3: Suns 109, Pistons 101 - I give Bassy credit for holding down the fort while Nash took the night off against LAC, and the rest paid off for Steve as he dished out 17 dimes, tied for a season high, against Detroit. Back to what I was saying earlier about contributions from everywhere? Robin Lopez had 14 points off the bench in this one, and Michael Redd had 11. If I so much as get a hangnail from now on, I’m going to Phoenix to have the Suns’ medical staff take a look at it. 5 points

It’s not so long ago that everyone was proclaiming this a lost season in Phoenix, and up until Thursday’s trade deadline many were holding out hope that the #FreeSteveNash movement would mercifully spring Canada’s finest from his Arizona prison.

Instead, the Suns join the Heat, Bulls, and Thunder (owners of the league’s three best records) as the only teams to go undefeated in the three play, and in doing so moved into 9th place in the Western Conference playoff chase, just two games behind the Nuggets, who just traded for JaVale McGee, so good luck with that. 10 points for the Suns, and total redemption for their first effort a month ago. This could be a playoff team after all.

Up next: The Clippers take their second crack at the triumvirate, playing three straight Mar. 20-22.

Three for all Top Ten:
Miami Heat (15 points)
Chicago Bulls (13 points)
OKC Thunder (12 points)
Phoenix Suns II (10 points)
New Jersey Nets II (8 points)
Atlanta Hawks (8 points)
Houston Rockets (7 points)
Portland Trail Blazers (6 points)
L.A. Clippers (6 points)
Philadelphia 76ers (6 points)

Full Three for all standings

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Grant Hill brings back the arm

by Zettler Clay

With March Madness around the corner, former Duke legend Grant Hill decided to remind us of a singular fact: The arm hasn’t gone anywhere.

20 years ago against the Kentucky Wildcats:


Last night against the Kings:


Ladies and gentlemen, the arm is here to stay.

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Three For All: Phoenix Suns

by Micah Hart



As everyone knows by now, the compressed NBA schedule will force every team to play three games in three nights at least one this season (42 times in total). With only 66 games to stake a claim to a playoff spot or seed, how teams perform during these killer slates could have a large impact on how their seasons turn out.

With that in mind, we’re going to keep track of each of the 42 three-plays to see which teams take advantage and which teams fall apart. Up next, the Phoenix Suns, who played three straight from Feb. 13-15.

While I have your attention, I’ll step aside from the task at hand for a moment and agree with the presiding opinion going around the Internet and say: Free Steve Nash.

The Suns have stated they have no interest in blowing up their team, and that is their right, but if their reasoning is that it alienates fans, I have to respectfully disagree. Fans want to win, clearly.  But what they really want is to compete for titles, and most intelligent fans are willing to tolerate a year or two of losing as long as there is light at the end of the tunnel.

Look no further than the Indianapolis Colts, who are most likely about to part ways with Peyton Manning — more an institution in his city than Nash is in Phoenix — and their fan base couldn’t be happier because they have Andrew Luck waiting to take his place. Suns fans know that Nash’s time is coming to an end regardless of where he plays, and as much as they’d hate to see him go, if they get some young prospects in return that help set them up to return to contention, they’ll take that deal all day long.

Why do I bring this up? Because the Suns joined the Detroit Pistons as the only two teams to lose every game in their three for all:

Game 1: Warriors 102, Suns 96 - One player the Suns shouldn’t trade is Marcin Gortat, who has evolved into one of the best centers in the NBA (though that does speak in part to the paucity of legit big men). The Polish Hammer had 25 points and 12 rebounds in the loss in Golden State. The loss snapped a seven-game winning streak for Phoenix against Golden State. -2 points

Game 2: Nuggets 109, Suns 92 - Phoenix sat Nash and Grant Hill for this one, trying to conserve their energy in the midst of the brutal stretch. So yeah, they really didn’t have much of a chance in this one. Markieff Morris had 21 points, which reminds me that in college, I always thought his brother Marcus was the hot shot recruit, and that he (Markieff) was sort of the Robin Lopez to his brother’s Brook. I mean, Marcus was Big 12 Player of the Year, and a second-team All-American. Then Markieff got drafted first (Marcus went to the Rockets with the very next pick), and now I question everything that happened to me in the last two years. Was it all just a dream? -1 point

Game 3: Hawks 101, Suns 99 - No one should get much grief for losing a third in three, but the Suns did lead by 15 points in the second half. Josh Smith had an absurd line for the Hawks (30 points, 17 rebounds, seven assists, four steals and three blocks), and when all is said and done I still expect someone’s injury to put him into his first All-Star Game next weekend in Orlando. 0 points

Time to face facts, Phoenix. The Nash-Era Suns are long gone, and the sooner you turn the page the better off you’ll be. -3 points for the Suns.

Up next: The Indiana Pacers and Portland Trail Blazers play three straight Feb. 14-16.

Three for all Top Ten:
Miami Heat (15 points)
Chicago Bulls (13 points)
OKC Thunder (12 points)
Atlanta Hawks (8 points)
Houston Rockets (7 points)
Portland Trail Blazers (6 points)
L.A. Clippers (6 points)
Philadelphia 76ers (6 points)
Denver Nuggets I (6 points)
Orlando Magic (5 points)

Full Three for all standings

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Bragging Rights Championship: Texas vs. Duke

by Micah Hart

In the final of All Ball’s inaugural Bragging Rights challenge, it’s no surprise to see the dominant college basketball program over the last two decades make it thus far. It is a little surprising to see their competition, traditionally known as a football school — but one that has churned out a sizable number of NBA players over the last decade. Who will win? That’s for you to decide. And if you need a refresher on the Bragging Rights rules, read up on them here. For a view of the entire bracket and how both teams got to the finals, check here. Onto the finale: 

VS

Texas Longhorns

Starters (all stats per 48 minutes, through 4/3):

LaMarcus Aldridge, Trail Blazers: 26.6 points, 10.4 rebounds, 2.5 assists, 1.4 blocks, 1.2 steals
D.J. Augustin, Bobcats: 20.5 points, 4.0 rebounds, 8.5 assists, 0.1 blocks, 0.8 steals
Kevin Durant, Thunder: 33.9 points, 8.4 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 1.2 blocks, 1.4 steals
T.J. Ford, Pacers: 14.1 points, 4.9 rebounds, 8.8 assists, 0.5 blocks, 2.0 steals
Maurice Evans, Wizards: 14.1 points, 4.9 rebounds, 1.4 assists, 0.4 blocks, 1.0 steals

Missed the cut: Damion James, Nets; Daniel Gibson, Cavaliers; Royal Ivey, Thunder; Dexter Pittman, Heat; Avery Bradley, Celtics

How they got here: Talk about March Madness. After easily dispatching Washington, the Horns beat UCLA literally at the buzzer, winning their matchup against the Bruins by a single vote in the Elite Eight. In the Final Four, the Horns edged out UConn in their closest match of the tournament, winning by a 52%-48% margin.

Team synopsis: As expected, the Durant-Aldridge combo has proven too much for any opponent thus far. Augustin is having a breakout season in Charlotte, and makes for a solid third option. Ford is somewhat redundant with Augustin on the floor, but his track record is a little better than rookie Damion James. Mo Evans is no star, but he is a capable defender and rebounder who can hit the corner three when needed.

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Bragging Rights Bracket: No. 1 Duke vs. No. 4 LSU



by Micah Hart

For the complete Bragging Rights rules and to vote for other matchups, click here. We now move to the fourth and final region, the South, with No. 1 seed Duke taking on play-in winner and 4-seed LSU, which won the battle of the bigs against Stanford to reach the Sweet 16.

VS

Duke Blue Devils

Starters (all stats per 48 minutes):

Carlos Boozer, Bulls: 27.1 points, 14.1 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 0.5 blocks, 1.0 steals
Corey Maggette, Bucks: 27.7 points, 8.3 rebounds, 2.8 assists, 0.2 blocks, 0.7 steals
Elton Brand, Sixers: 20.8 points, 11.9 rebounds, 1.9 assists, 1.6 blocks, 1.6 steals
Grant Hill, Suns: 20.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 0.7 blocks, 1.3 steals
Luol Deng, Bulls: 21.8 points, 7.1 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 0.7 blocks, 1.2 steals

Missed the cut: Shane Battier, Grizzlies; Chris Duhon, Magic; Mike Dunleavy, Pacers; Gerald Henderson, Bobcats; Dahntay Jones, Pacers; Josh McRoberts, Pacers; JJ Redick, Magic; Shelden Williams, Knicks

Team synopsis: People have a tendency to think that Duke players don’t do so well in the pros, but man, look at this lineup. Big and burly, and good luck keeping Brand, Boozer, and Maggette off the offensive glass. The only thing that could pose a problem for the Dookies is a lack of a top-notch outside shooter or true distributor, but Hill and Deng are good enough. Each guy on this team can put the ball in the basket.

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Last night in … turning back the clock

by Micah Hart

With all of the talk about injuries this season to Yao Ming and Greg Oden, with people wondering if they’ll ever be able to play again, it’s easy to despair. But look no further than last night’s performance by Grant Hill in the Suns’ OT win in Oklahoma City for proof that life is long, and if you work hard enough, there may still be time to salvage that career yet.

Hill dropped 30 and 11 on OKC, the first time he’s gone for a 30-10 game since 2000, when he was still with the Pistons (sorry Orlando!). According to stats dude Kevin Cottrell, at 38 Hill became the oldest player to score 30+ since Reggie Miller scored 34 at the age of 39 on April 10, 2005, and became the oldest player to go 30+10 since MJ did it for the Wizards (35 and 11) on February 27, 2003, at age 40.

Not bad Grant, you still got it. 40′s the new 30 anyway, right?

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