Posts Tagged ‘Jason Kidd’

Watergate 2: Blake Griffin vs. Fan

By Nick Margiasso IV

Maybe NBA franchises just need to buy less-slippery cups.

After fouling out of Saturday’s Clippers-Warriors game late, Los Angeles’ Blake Griffin made it two controversial drink spills in the NBA this season. This time, there was a victim. This time, it was water. Call it “Watergate,” but that’s already been taken. Purposely or not, Griffin doused a Golden State fan positioned directly behind him at the scorer’s table as the L.A. star reacted by throwing his arms back in disbelief upon seeing the replay of his last foul on the arena jumbotron.

And, oh yeah, he had a cup full of water in his hand. So, this happened…

VIDEO: Blake Griffin of the Clippers douses fan with water

Remind you of anything?

VIDEO: Jason Kidd, coach of the Nets, spills drink on court mid-game

 

That time when Jason Kidd was a rapper

By Lang Whitaker, NBA.com

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Last summer, Jason Kidd made the rare move of going from being an active NBA player to an NBA coach. And while there were some bumps in the road, overall Kidd has done a nice job, being named Eastern Conference coach of the month for both January and March.

As it turns out, Kidd’s non-traditional route to becoming a coach had one mostly-forgotten detour through hip-hop music. Back in 1994, Kidd was part of a compilation album called B-Ball’s Best Kept Secret, which featured several NBA players — including Shaquille O’Neal, Cedric Ceballos, Dana Barros — showing their skills as rappers. (Funnily enough, Brian Shaw, who is also in his first season as a head coach this season, also had a track on the record.)

The New York Times caught up with Kidd this week to talk to him about his experience recording, “What the Kidd Didd.” As Kidd told the Times, “That’s something on my bucket list that I can say I’ve done, because I’d never do it again.” The whole story is a fun one, well worth a read.

And as for the song? Well, you be the judge…


VIDEO: What the Kidd Didd

Brooklyn Nets Vs. Arsenal In HORSE

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — With the Nets and Hawks in England, it only made sense to set up a basketball vs. football match-up. (And by “football,” I mean “soccer.”) So Nets coach Jason Kidd and center Mason PLumlee squared off against Arsenal’s Lukas Podolski and Lukasz Fabianski in a game of HORSE. Neither Kidd nor Plumlee are/were particularly known for their shooting, so perhaps the result of this game shouldn’t be too much of a surprise.


VIDEO: Nets vs Arsenal

Did Kidd Learn Drink Spill From Previous Experience?

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — We had a mini-controversy erupt over the long NBA offseason, as Nets coach Jason Kidd became embroiled in…CupGate? WaterGate? SodaGate?

Whatever you want to call it, late in a close game against the Lakers and out of timeouts, Kidd may or may not have intentionally spilled a drink onto the court to delay the game. The Nets basically got a free timeout out of the incident, but lost the game anyway. Kidd was fined $50,000, and he apologized and everyone mostly moved on.

But Mavericks owner Mark Cuban spotted something he might have seen before, and he took to Twitter to point it out. Turns out a drink spill happened in a Dallas/Chicago game back in 2009, giving the Bulls a few free seconds to make some adjustments.

And who was on the court for Dallas when all this occurred? Point guard Jason Kidd…

VIDEO: Spilled Drink Delays Bulls/Mavs

(via FTW)

Horry Scale: Joe Cool


VIDEO: Joe Johnson’s GWBB

The game winning buzzer beaters are coming fast and furious now. So yeah, we’re on the third Horry Scale entry of the last seven days, as last night Joe Johnson and the Brooklyn Nets went to Phoenix, and their game drifted into overtime before JJ managed to end it with a dagger. NBA players obviously can not resist the allure of making Horry Scale appearances.

Before we get too far into this, we should stop and explain. What is the Horry Scale? For those who are new around these parts, the Horry Scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

With the rules in place, let’s check out last night’s game-winner.

DIFFICULTY
I’ve long held that Joe Johnson is one of the most underrated offensive players in the NBA. I watched nearly every Hawks game he played, and saw him night after night carry the load offensively. It wasn’t always pretty, it wasn’t always the most efficient offense, but it was more often than not effective. Johnson can score in so many ways, and that versatility was on display last night. Joe’s GWBB was a runner in the paint with two defenders coming after him. Joe put a slight hesitation dribble on PJ Tucker and watched him soar past, then went up and lofted the ball high over Channing Frye for the bucket, just in time. On first glance it wasn’t particularly spectacular, but the more I watch it the more impressive it becomes — going the length of the court in four seconds, being patient enough to let Tucker take himself out of the play, and then getting the shot off cleanly over a seven-footer before the clock trickled out of time.

GAME SITUATION
So here we are, game tied at 98 in overtime, 8 seconds remaining on the clock and about 2 on the shot clock, and Frye misses a three from the wing. Johnson ends up with the rebound, and the rest is history. You often hear coaches debate whether or not to use a timeout in those circumstances. Do you stop the game to set up a play, but also potentially allow the defense to get set? Or do you take advantage of the chaos and let them play? Another potential subplot for the Nets is, Who takes the final shot in a close game? All of these issues were avoided by Coach Kidd by just letting the game play out in the moment. (Worth noting: Deron Williams had sprained his ankle earlier and was out, so perhaps that played into Kidd’s decision as well.)

IMPORTANCE
The Nets have been struggling this season, starting off 2-5, one loss away from the basement in the Eastern Conference, and not looking anything like the contending team most experts projected them to be. Conversely, the Suns have been surprisingly good, beginning 5-3 and making people wonder if talk of tanking was premature. It’s still early in the season, but a W for the Nets could help them start to turn things around. As Johnson said after the game, “It was big. There could be a domino effect.” The Nets better hope so: They play the Clippers in Los Angeles tonight.

CELEBRATION
The jubilation was there, if a bit muted until Kevin Garnett arrived and shook up the huddle a bit. To be fair, Joe Johnson has never been accused of being demonstrative. (Also, check out Tucker in the background on his knees, head to the court, literally floored by the loss.) “I couldn’t even celebrate, I was so tired,” Johnson told the New York Post. (He logged almost 45 minutes between regulation and overtime.) “But I was just ready to get out of there. [My teammates] are trying to celebrate and I’m ready to go… I’m like, ‘Let’s go into the locker room and shower and let’s get out of here. … We’ve got a tough game tomorrow.’”

GRADE
Sneaky difficult shot, pretty important game for the Nets, a team excited to get the win. There have been tougher and more important game winners, for sure, but I feel like this a GWBB that will overlooked by some. Anyway, for the reasons outlined above, I’m giving this one three Horrys.

horry-starhorry-starhorry-star

That’s my take. How many Horry’s would you give Joe Johnson’s game-winner?

Talk Show: John Stockton


VIDEO: John Stockton’s Playing Career

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — During his 19-year NBA career, played entirely with the Utah Jazz, John Stockton was known for many things. His court vision was unparalleled — he led the NBA in assists for nine consecutive seasons and retired with 15,806 assists, more than any player in league history, as well as 3,265 steals, the most all-time. He was unbelievably resilient — Stockton missed a total of just 22 regular season games over his career. And of course, Stockton teamed with Karl Malone to create teams that were consistent contenders in the Western Conference (if not the league).

But Stockton was also perhaps just as well known for the things he did not do — Stockton eschewed showing off, being flashy for the sake of flash. He wore the most uniform uniform possible, and he never said anything designed to make headlines or draw attention to himself. So it might come as something of a surprise to fans of both Stockton and the Jazz that Stockton has penned an autobiography, Assisted, available now. The book details Stockton’s remarkable story, of how a guy just over six feet tall and weighing maybe 170 pounds was able to make himself one of the giants of NBA history.

Earlier this week we sat down with Stockton in New York City to talk about the book, his career, and his take on the NBA today.

Assisted Stockton_cover Book

ME: You write about how you started this book because you were really just trying to get all this information down for your kids to have one day. Previous to this had you ever really had any interest in writing?

STOCKTON: No. I was looking for alternatives for something to do with my life. I am very busy — I do coaching, I have parts of businesses — but there’s a void in those days that was pretty quiet, and I was shuffling my feet, trying to figure out what to do. That was the first time I thought [writing] might be a good solution. I didn’t want to find another career, because I didn’t want it to interfere with the stuff I really was enjoying since retirement. So it seemed like a nice fit, and I found a nice project in it.

ME: Were you a reader at all?

STOCKTON: Yeah, I love to read. I didn’t read much in college except for homework, then afterward I fell in love with books. Our (assistant) coach, Phil Johnson with the Jazz, was an avid lover of non-fiction. He’s turned me on to lots of books. So I read a lot now.

ME: Non-fiction?

STOCKTON: Mostly, yeah. There are some great stories out there.

ME: What was your process like as a writer? Did you carve out a couple of hours every day? Or were there times where you’d wake up in the middle of the night and jot something down?

STOCKTON: That’s a great question. It started with the idea. I went and visited my old coach (Kerry Pickett), who was a really well-read guy and who helped me throughout. So we talked for a long time. He took notes and kind of made a little sketch of an outline, which I would never do, because I just want to write, I didn’t want to organize. So he organized, then he’d send me little assignments. He said, “OK, this is what you seem to want to talk about, you go write about this for a while.” And then it might be a month, it might be three months, it might have been six months, depending on what my schedule was like — like summertime, we’d go on AAU trips and stuff like that, there’s no time. So we’d wait. So it took about four or five years but that’s how it would work. But yeah, I’d be sitting in church and would think, “Why didn’t I think about that?” And I’d write it down on the envelopes. Or I’d wake up in the middle of the night — not often — and I’d write down a note. So that was helpful.

ME: That reminds me of the “Seinfeld” episode where he wakes up in the middle of the night and writes down a hilarious joke and then the next day can’t read his writing.

STOCKTON: (laughing) “Seinfeld’s” great!

ME: In the book one of the things you write about is the importance of balance and vision for a basketball player. Is that something that can be taught? Or is that something that has to be innate for an athlete?

STOCKTON: I think it can be enhanced. One thing I’ve watched coaching my own kids and their friends, for instance, is there are some kids that have certain things, it seems like from the get-go. You almost don’t have to say anything to them, but they get it. And then there’s other ones that you can’t turn your back on them because you’re trying to get better as a team, so they need to get it. So yeah, you can definitely get better at balance, can definitely get better at vision, but can you go off the charts if you’re not wired for that? Probably not.

ME: You wrote in the book about Jeff Hornacek having such a great knowledge of the game when you played with him. How much does having a great knowledge for a sport play a part in success versus just outstanding athleticism? Basically, how much does knowing where to position yourself matter versus having just great natural ability?

STOCKTON: Well, you see it every day. I think it’s the most overlooked thing in sports, in all sports. You watch baseball, a centerfielder may not run a 4.2 forty, but he gets to every single ball. What is he seeing that the rest of us aren’t? Jeff Hornacek was a plenty good enough athlete — he didn’t have a deficiency in that area that he overcame with intelligence — but boy was he bright. And he knew things in advance, he had numbers in his head and he could combine them all. So, special guy. I think right now it’s easier to go find that cookie-cutter athlete and say, “That’s my next starting center fielder.” Where I think they miss — and I’m picking on baseball but this is all sports — is they’re missing that guy that gets it, who has great anticipation, has a feel for where the pitch is and where it’s going to strike the bat and is already there. That’s a baseball player to me.

ME: The book talks a lot about your competitive streak. If you hadn’t become a basketball player, do you think you would have done something else in sports?

STOCKTON: I would have sure tried. As with all kids growing up you’ve got a ball in your hands, you’ve got a bat in your hands. So I would have sure tried like crazy. I was probably most equipped for baseball, although I never really shined in it and never had the type of coaching I had in basketball. Football, I just matured too late. I thought someday maybe I could be a quarterback but when you’re 94 pounds in high school, it’s pretty tough to enhance those skills much (laughs).

Portland Trailblazers  vs. Utah Jazz

ME: Karl Malone says in the foreward of your book how when you played you never really opened up much with the media, even though you did have thoughts and opinions. But because you never talked about those things, people thought you didn’t really have opinions on those things. Why did you feel like now was the time to open up?

STOCKTON: Well, I have a lot of opinions that didn’t make the book. That’s a fine line. When you’re talking and you and I are in a room and this (points to digital recorder) isn’t on, we could have a lot more open discussion about sensitive topics because we could get through any hiccups. Once you’re writing and it’s on paper and you’re defending it to nobody, that’s a tough proposition. I don’t feel like I’m really venting a lot of opinions. I would like to have, in a way. But it’s a tough venue. Karl and I could talk about anything, but most of that stuff I’m not putting in print.

ME: Were you at all leery about opening yourself up and putting it down on paper?

STOCKTON: No. I don’t feel like I have. I don’t feel like I have betrayed myself or my family. It’s really important to me that they have their privacy. My kids should have the choice of following in that or in being a perfectly anonymous citizen. So it was really important for me not to spoil any of that hard-sought stuff for this. So I tried to tell good stories about good people and how they were helpful without betraying any of the confidences and privacy that they deserved.

ME: Throughout the book you details lessons you learned from situations in your life or in your NBA career. Was that something you wanted to hammer home?

STOCKTON: I think everybody’s perception, especially for a professional athlete, is that it’s always been easy: You’re always a great shooter, you always cruise through it, whatever. But when you get to the point of learning opportunities, I looked forward to them. Being the younger child, my brother was better than me at pretty much everything. I didn’t weigh much at all, so I was kind of just saying, “You got me there, you got me there,” and little by little you kind of whittle the difference down until you’re a better player. I don’t know if an older brother has a chance to do that, because you’re always the king.

ME: I’ve heard people talk about a boy having an older brother being a big thing because they kind of show you the ropes — they show you what music to listen to, what TV shows to watch, all that stuff.

STOCKTON: (nodding) When my brother and my Dad would get mad at each other about anything — maybe it was mowing the lawn — I figured, “Hey, I’m going to mow the lawn. I’m not going to get caught in this.” There were so many lessons every day.

ME: And then you get the brownie points — “Hey, John mowed the lawn without us asking!”

STOCKTON: (laughing) Exactly!

ME: One story I liked in the book that you didn’t go into a lot of detail on is when Karl got drafted by the Jazz and first visited Salt Lake City, the two of you spent a day getting to know each other at the zoo. What compelled you guys to wake up and go to the zoo?

STOCKTON: I don’t remember. He’s just a country kid, and we’re in Salt Lake and I’m just a year into it, so I don’t exactly have command of it myself. I said to him, “We could drive up into the mountains, that’s gorgeous. Or maybe we could…go to the zoo?” And he said, “Zoo? Sounds good. Let’s go.” So we had a beautiful afternoon there. Pretty peaceful.

ME: You talked in the book about how Adam Keefe was one of the best teammates you ever had. What other players that people might not immediately think of were some of your favorite teammates?

STOCKTON: Greg Foster was one. Antoine Carr was a great teammate. Bryon Russell. Shannon Anderson. Howard Eisley was absolutely one of my favorites. The team that went to the Finals was loaded with the type of teammates that you hope for. I know I left out some guys, but those were some of my favorite teammates.

ME: What made them good teammates? Good people? Good players?

STOCKTON: First of all, great players. And players where it wasn’t all about them — they were willing to make their sacrifices for the squad without feeling sacrificial. Fit in, got better — they didn’t just sit there and think, “Hey, Karl Malone is going to carry us.” They got better and we got better as a result. They were not afraid to say something to you, “Hey, I’m seeing this. Take a look at that when you’re out there.” And having the right approach with different guys — you can’t talk to everybody the same way.

ME: When you retired you said something about making sure your shorts were hemmed up high throughout your career. Were the short shorts a deliberate choice?

STOCKTON: My second-to-last year, I think — my seventeenth year — the equipment manager came up to me and said, “Would like to lengthen your shorts?” I really didn’t know that it was an option. I’d never asked, and they’d never asked me. So we just kind of kept plugging on. Everybody kept talking about my shorts and I thought, “Well, I didn’t change anything…”

ME: You didn’t maybe notice around you that the shorts were getting bigger and longer?

STOCKTON: Yeah, but I was comfortable with it. I also saw other guys with 34-inch waists get 40-inch shorts and then just cinch them, and that…that didn’t make any sense to me.

Utah Jazz

ME: What made Jerry Sloan such a great coach?

STOCKTON: Fiercely competitive. He eliminates nonsense. The hard-nose tag is probably accurate, but you don’t sit there thinking that he’s tough every day — he’s a very reasonable man. Smart. He’s been around the game forever. Furthermore, if we won, it was a credit to the players. If we lost, it was all him, so he always took the blame, gave the credit, and provided the opportunity for us to play without having to be something more than basketball players. He said, “Hey, you guys want to shine, play better.” He said, “Do it with your play.” So I think those were some of the reasons that he was great.

ME: Was he the kind of coach who gave the fiery motivational speech? Did he have the quotes on the wall? He seems a little more pragmatic than that.

STOCKTON: Not a quote on the wall guy. Every once in a while, a little fire and brimstone. But, you know, you play 100-something games every year, I don’t know how many times you can afford to go to the well on that. He called it like you saw it, you knew where you stood, and knew what he expected of you.

ME: What younger players do you like to watch today?

STOCKTON: That’s a good question. I don’t see enough games to be fair about it. My kids are very active in sports, so I’m going to football games, basketball games, baseball games, practices. So I get home and the Jazz game will be on — we are in their territory since Seattle departed. So we get a large portion of their games. Really, all I get to see is them and who they’re playing against on any given night. So I don’t have a great feel for the guys that are out there. And yet I probably still have some decent opinions, but they’re so snap-shotty, that I really don’t feel it’s fair.

ME: Do you still watch a lot of NBA games?

STOCKTON: I watch a lot of playoff games. The timing seems to work better, for whatever reason — the high school sports are done by then. But regular season I don’t catch a bunch. I’ve coached in high schools with the boys and girls, and then we’ve got kids in AAU and all that, so it’s busy. Maybe someday.

ME: Who was the toughest player for you to play against in the NBA?

STOCKTON: There are a number of them. When I was younger, clearly Magic Johnson was tough, probably impossible for me to guard. Kevin Johnson, Mark Price, Isiah Thomas — those were the killer guys at my position. Evolving into, of course, Gary Payton, Jason Kidd, Steve Nash. There was never a shortage of guys at that position.

ME: We had Isiah on our podcast recently and I asked him how many points he would have averaged if he played in his prime with the rules the way they are today, and he said might average 40.

STOCKTON: He might be right.

ME: Would your career have been different if you had played the entire time with these rules — no hand-checking, all that stuff?

STOCKTON: No question. I think it’s a lot less physical game. I think in some ways they’re almost attempting to ruin it. The charge line drives me crazy. I hate that line. And I didn’t take a ton of charges — you might think that I did, but I didn’t. The advantage is just to anyone that leaves their feet. I think there’s such a game that’s being missed when they’re protecting those guys. In our day there was a risk to that. Now you leave your feet and you’re protected. Now if you get touched on the head it’s a threat of concussion and maybe this person should be suspended for a couple of weeks. I saw guys — myself included — clotheslined. Whether intentional or not, it happens. So I’m disappointed in that trend. I’d like to see them maybe discourage some of that and give basketball players a chance to blossom a little bit, instead of just people who can leave their feet.

ME: What do you think of the advance stats that are so pervasive in sports today? Do you think there’s a place for that in basketball or sports?

STOCKTON: Well, I watched Moneyball and read that book, and I watched the Oakland A’s every year. So I think about that: Is there some sort of formula that would work for a basketball player? I’m not smart enough to figure that out. I imagine there’s something in there, but it’s going to be a long time before I can help you with it (laughs).

Talk Show: Raymond Felton


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ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Going into the the 2011-12 season, the Knicks saw popular point guard Jeremy Lin sign with Houston, and they replacedKnockout Blue:Pirate:Black him with Raymond Felton, a former Knick coming off a down season in Portland. While Lin and the Rockets had a nice season, Felton helped coalesce Carmelo Anthony, JR Smith and Tyson Chandler and lead the Knicks to a 54-28 record, their best since ’96-97, and into the second round of the playoffs. This season, Felton says the Knicks have their goals set a bit higher.

I caught up with Felton last week in New York City, where Felton was at an event for Under Armour to help launch its newest basketball shoe, the Anatomix Spawn (right), which he’ll wear this season.

ME: So, what are you doing this summer?

FELTON: I’ve just been training, working out. Trying to spend a little bit of time with family and friends, but for the most part, just really been grinding, just getting after it.

ME: No travel or vacation? You don’t get to take some time off?

FELTON: You know, only traveling I did, when the season ended and we lost, I went to the Bahamas for like four nights, and that’s it. I went to Vegas, but I don’t really count that because that was business. I went down there to watch the team play at Summer League, and I got some workouts in there. I stayed down there an extra week because my AAU Program was coming down to play in tournaments, so I stayed down there to do that. So really, vacation? I haven’t had any.

ME: When you say your AAU program, what do you mean?

FELTON: Team Felton. I’ve got like 5, 6 teams, a legit program.

ME: Is that something where when you played AAU as a kid, you thought, “One day I want to be able to sponsor a program and give other kids this opportunity”?

FELTON: Yeah. You know, the AAU business can be a real crooked business, and I hate to see kids get taken advantage of, man. So I just try to give back. I have a nephew who’s pretty good, so it started with his age group, and I’ve just added teams up from that. It’s been good, my team’s doing pretty good. My highest age group, which is his age group, they finished in the top eight in the country this year. The 14-and-under group, they finished fourth. My other young teams down there, they actually won nationals this year. It’s been pretty good, man.

ME: And are you in the stands cheering during the games?

FELTON: Yeah, I’m in the stands, trying to coach a little bit. You know, get on the referees when they’re making me mad, be like Mark Cuban a little bit. But it’s all fun. I just like to see the kids compete and then try to do the best they can.

ME: For a student of the game and fan of the game, what is it like being the point guard of the New York Knicks? Is it cool?

FELTON: It’s great, man. To be the point guard of the New York Knicks is like being the point guard of the University of North Carolina. When you put that jersey on, everybody will know who you are, everybody will recognize you. It’s a good feeling, it’s a good feeling. I feel like when you play here in the city of New York, if you play hard, they’ll love you. When you’re slacking, they’ll let you know. That’s one thing I do know about New York — these fans, they’ll let you know if you’re not playing up to the part. Which is a good thing.

ME: It’s kind of like Carolina, right? The standards are set pretty high.

FELTON: Yep. If you’re not playing up to the part, they’ll let you know. But it’s fun. I love it.

New York Knicks v Indiana Pacers - Game SixME: When the Knicks signed you last summer, a different point guard in the NBA, an All-Star, told me that he thought you would be the perfect fit for the Knicks, because the Knicks were a team with a lot of options and strong personalities, and you’d be able to sort of direct everything and take control.

FELTON: I feel like I’m somebody that Melo and those guys, they respect me. So if I tell them something, they’re not going to get mad, they’re not going to look at me crazy. They respect my game, they respect me as a point guard. I’m going to get you guys the ball. I know that you and JR need to score this basketball for us. I think those guys, they saw that last year, and this year there’s going to be even more of a respect level, because we had a good season as a team. So I think those guys respected me, just like I give them that same respect back. That’s a big part of having a good team — if you’ve got that respect for each other, it’s easy to play with each other.

ME: Last season you guys had a lot of new parts. How long did you feel like it took you guys to kind of get on the same page?

FELTON: It really took the preseason, and we really tried to click, and we got our bumps and bruises out of the way. Because when the season started, we were rolling.

ME: Right, you guys were red-hot, started 15-5.

FELTON: The biggest thing we wanted to do, we wanted to get off to a great start because we looked toward the end of the year, and our schedule was tough. But we ended up with that tough schedule killing it, won 13 in a row, with all those back-to-backs, back-to-backs, travel, travel. Just the mental toughness that we have a team, after all of that, as a team, and as individuals, and just how we trust and respect one another, I think that’s really big. If you trust and respect one another, I think that takes a team a long way.

ME: What’s it like playing with Carmelo Anthony? Because he’s such a great player, and he kind of gets overshadowed a bit by guys like LeBron or Kevin Durant. Even though he might be the best scorer in the NBA …

FELTON: Without a doubt. Without a doubt. Because he scores in so many ways. There’s a lot of guys who can score the basketball in this league. Kevin Durant, by far, is one of the top ones. Him and Melo could be neck-and-neck — those guys can score in a lot of ways. But Melo can score in more ways than KD, because Melo can post up, he can score off the dribble, he can score in the mid-range, he can score finishing at the rim, and he can shoot threes. You’re talking about a guy who has a total, complete game, and he’s big and strong — 6-8, big body, strong body. A lot of people like to talk about how he takes a lot of shots, this and that. Listen man: We need him to score. It gets maximized because if you’re having an off night and you take thirty-something shots, it’s like, “Aw man, he’s shooting too much.” If you’re having a great night, he’s got 40-something points and he took thirty-something shots, ain’t nobody saying nothing. I just tell him, “You do what we need you to do. As a team, we know what you’re going to do every night.” So we gotta adjust our games to that. Me as a point guard, I have to adjust my game to that. I hate when people say about him, “He takes too many shots.” People try to compare him and LeBron — two different games. Melo is who he is, LeBron is who he is. So I hate when they try to make those comparisons. You can’t say Larry Bird and Michael Jordan had the same game. They’re different, but they both got chips. Add Magic Johnson in there. Those guys all had totally, completely different games. But they all got rings. That’s all it is. I support Melo 100 percent. He knows that. We all do. And we want to continue to keep working and get better.

ME: You spent last season playing with Jason Kidd. What kind of coach do you think he’ll be this season in Brooklyn?

FELTON: I think he’ll be a great coach, but at the end of the day, he’s not going to have to do too mCharlotte Bobcats v New York Knicksuch coaching. He can do like Phil Jackson did — he might have drawn something up out of the timeouts, he might have talked about a couple of things during halftime, but Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, those guys ran the team, they made the game. You’ve got Deron Williams, one of the best point guards in the league, you’ve got Joe Johnson, Paul Pierce, Kevin Garnett, Brook Lopez, those guys understand the game and they’re veterans, so there’s not too much coaching you can do. But he’s going to be great for Deron. He was great for me last year. He made my game better. He made me look at a lot of things a whole lot differently, as far as on the court and off the court. So mentally, he’s going to be great for D, without a doubt. He’s going to make him better mentally, and make him better when he’s on the court. The team themselves? Really, they’re going to be fine on their own. As far as a coach, he’s going to be a great coach. A guy who knows the game the way he does, played the game at the level he played, he’s going to be a great coach. Especially as a point guard, because as a point guard you have to understand every position. Say a coach has 50 plays, you’ve got to know 50 plays, but you’ve got to know every position for every play. That’s something a lot of people don’t understand. So he knows every position. It’s going to take him time to get used to going from playing last year to being a head coach this year, but I think overall he’s going to be a great coach.

ME: I live in Manhattan and I know people in the city and the boroughs love the Knicks. But the last few years, with the move to Brooklyn, it feels like people are starting to talk a little more about the Nets. But do you feel like this is still a Knicks town?

FELTON: Oh, without a doubt. I still feel like it. We’ve still got New York on our chest. We’re still the New York Knicks. We’re still the city’s team, without a doubt. Brooklyn can do whatever, and we’re still going to be the city’s team. There’s nothing like having New York on your chest. Brooklyn is going to be a good team, and I think it’s good for the city, for the state, to have the Nets in Brooklyn. It’s going to be a good, big rivalry, well talked about, which is great. I’m loving it. I don’t care that they’re here — I’m happy they’re here, actually. It’s going to be fun.

ME: So this season is just weeks away now — what are your expectations for the Knicks?

FELTON: Same thing as last year. I feel like we should grow and try to capitalize on what we did last year. We didn’t finish the postseason as well as we wanted, but as far as the season that we had, we had over 50 wins, we won our division, finished second in the East. That says a lot right there, we had a great year. Best season we’ve had in 13 years. So we’ve got to capitalize on that, try to get better from there.

ME: And how do you get better from there?

FELTON: As far as the overall season, all you can do is win more games. (Laughs.) There’s nothing else you can really do as far as that. In the postseason, that’s the biggest thing for us. You’ve got to take care of those 82 games, but if you do that and advance to the postseason, we’ve got to try and advance further than we did last season, and get past that second round, get to the Eastern Conference Finals, and go from there. One step at a time. I feel like if we do better than we did last year, it’s an overall successful year. But it’s one step at a time, one game at a time.

Jason Kidd Makes Coaching Debut, Fist Bumps For Everyone

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — The Brooklyn Nets needed a new coach this summer, and the hire of Jason Kidd, one of the great point guards in franchise history, took everyone by a bit of surprise. He had never coached before, after all, and he’d played in the NBA as recently as this past season. Moreover, he last played for Brooklyn’s archrivals, the New York Knicks. But none of that means he doesn’t have the potential to be an excellent coach. Kidd saw the game like few others, and it would seem like a skill he should be able to translate from the court to the sideline.

Exactly how will Kidd coach the Nets? What will be his philosophy? After Kidd’s summer league debut yesterday in Orlando, we still don’t know for certain exactly what kind of system he’ll run — although Kidd did pick up a technical foul, so expect him to be fiery on the bench.

But one thing does seem pretty clear: Fist bumps will be a major part of what they do.
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(via The Big Lead)

Knicks End Wild Quarter On Wild Shot

by Zettler Clay IV

The Knicks are rolling, and when one of the best scorers this league has ever seen has it going, effects can be contagious. When the Bucks visited Gotham City to take on Carmelo Anthony and the league’s hottest team, the fever pitch came in the third quarter.

After seeing the 1972-73 Knicks championship team honored at halftime, the Knicks came out firing. They scored 42 points, ‘Melo had 18 of them and Jason Kidd capped things off with this beauty to send the crowd nuts:



As for the Syracuse alumnus, he poured in a measly 41 points (third straight game of 40 or more) and pulled down 14 rebounds in the Knicks’ 11th straight victory.

Tim Duncan Finds New Way To Clean Boards

by Zettler Clay IV

So what happens when 39-year-old Jason Kidd boxes out 36-year-old Tim Duncan? An unusual rebound and score:



On top of grabbing the ball from around Kidd’s back, Duncan scores on reigning Defensive Player of the Year Tyson Chandler, runs back down court like he didn’t just grab a rebound from behind somebody’s back and score on a Defensive Player of the Year.

Gotta love the NBA.

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