Posts Tagged ‘Josh McRoberts’

Josh McRoberts is Hollywood Hogan

ALL BALL NERVE CENTERJosh McRoberts is your new favorite wrestling heel. The case for:

• Last postseason, as a then-member of the Bobcats, he delivered a forearm shiver to LeBron James.

• He’s got the flowing locks any good villain should have.

• His beard makes him seem mysterious and inscrutable.

• As we saw last night, you don’t want to be around McRoberts when he gets angry…

(via B/R)

Horry Scale: CDR pays dividends

By Lang Whitaker, NBA.com


VIDEO: CDR’s game-winner

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — It’s been three weeks since we last fired up the Horry Scale, and in the time since, we’ve been mostly focused on the playoff race. As teams fought for position, somehow we had no game-winning buzzer-beaters that would require the Horry Scale to be utilized. Tonight that all ended, in the inked-out arms of Charlotte’s Chris Douglas-Roberts, as the Bobcats knocked off the Atlanta Hawks, 95-93.

Before we get too far into this, we should stop and explain why we’re here: What is the Horry Scale? For those who are new around these parts, the Horry Scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

One thing I’d like to clear up: The Horry Scale does not measure only a game-winning shot; the Horry Scale measures several facets of a Game-Winning Buzzer-Beater. So we’re talking about not only the shot, but also the play that creates the shot, the situation and the drama, the celebrations … basically, everything surrounding and including the shot. So when I gave Randy Foye a 3 Horry rating, that wasn’t only a reflection of his shot, which was admittedly remarkable, as I wrote, but also the play, which was awful. Taj Gibson’s lefty layup wasn’t the toughest shot, but that inbounds play was terrific. Basically, everything matters.

We all clear? OK, let’s break tonight’s shot down, our 17th Horry Scale entry of the season…

DIFFICULTY
A runner over two defenders? Tougher than it sounds. We should say here that the Hawks weren’t playing with a full deck, as they gave rotation members DeMarre Carroll, Kyle Korver and Paul Millsap the night off. (The Bobcats also limited the minutes of their key players.) With playoff berths secure for both teams, they seemed content to let some of their bench players battle this one out. That said, CDR was well defended, and his shot flew high into the air before splashing through the net.

GAME SITUATION
Gary Neal and Sekou Smith’s favorite player, Luke Ridnour, carried the Bobcats throughout the fourth quarter. But the Hawks rallied late after a 5-0 run from Shelvin Mack brought them within two, and then a jumper from Lou Williams with 2.6 to play knotted the game at 93. With the game tied, the Bobcats inbounded the ball on the side in front of their basket. With Martin Sargent-lookalike Josh McRoberts inbounding, the Bobcats sent Ridnour and Chris Douglas-Roberts running in a wide arc, as Al Jefferson set a pick and Gary Neal flashed to the corner. The Hawks covered all of this very well, and none of the initial options were open. With maybe a second left to inbound the ball, Douglas-Roberts flashed from the basline to the top of the key, and momentarily lost defender Lou Williams on a brush screen from Jefferson. CDR drove left, pulled up from just inside the free-throw line, and knocked down the game-winner over a recovering Williams and help defender Mike Muscala, with no time to play.

CELEBRATION
The celebration was mostly subdued. Gary Neal wrapped Douglas-Roberts in a bear hug in front of the Hawks bench, and even Bobcats sideline reporter Stephanie Ready got in a high five. it felt like both teams were more concerned with the playoffs starting later this week.

GRADE
I’m going to give this one two Horrys. It was a nice shot, sure, but when one team doesn’t care enough to have their best players in the game, it detracts from the fun a bit. Not that this should matter to Charlotte — they wanted to win and ran the best play possible for them to win it. Heckuva shot from CDR, no doubt. But all in all, I’m going two stars …

horry-star horry-star

What say you? How many Horry’s would you give Chris Douglas-Roberts’ GWBB?

Horry Scale: Kemba Can


VIDEO: Walker’s Big Shot

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — These things happen in bunches, it would seem. Seriously, we go days, weeks even, without any movement on the Horry Scale, and then it all goes crazy. Now it’s as though we can’t go a day or two without a Game-Winning Buzzer-Beater happening. And that’s not counting Damian Lillard twice flirting with entries on the Scale and missing by tenths of seconds.

Before we get too far into this, we should stop and explain: What is the Horry Scale? For those who are new around these parts, the Horry Scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

With the rules in place, today we look north of the border to lovely Toronto, Canada, where Charlotte’s Kemba Walker pulled off some last-second magic…

DIFFICULTY
The Bobcats had the ball out of bounds with exactly one second remaining and the score tied at 102. The play the Bobcats drew up essentially had two players staggered a few feet away from each other, running a loop away from the ball. Al Jefferson then set a screen right around the free-throw line for Walker, who flashed across the lane and cleared space for himself by literally rubbing off Jefferson as he went past. As Walker cleared Jefferson and neared inbounds man Josh McRoberts, he drifted toward the baseline, further separating himself from defender Kyle Lowry. Toronto center Jonas Valanciunas, who switched on the play and left Jefferson for Walker, was able to get a hand up in Walker’s face, but it was too little, too late, and Walker was left with a catch-and-shoot jump shot from about 16 feet for the win. Nice shot considering the circumstances, but basically an open catch-and-shoot by NBA standards. (Also, shout-out to McRoberts for the nifty pump-fake on the inbound pass — he fakes right then passes left — which created the room to make the pass.)

GAME SITUATION
Tie score, in overtime, one second left. It doesn’t get much more money than that. But it’s also worth noting that the Bobcats had been down 16 earlier in the night and managed to come back and make a game of it. Also, Bobcats coach Steve Clifford noted that Walker sinking a GWBB like that was “in his nature.” Nobody associated with the Bobcats has won much of anything in the NBA, at least since being associated with the Bobcats, but it’s worth remembering that while in college at Connecticut, Walker hit his share of big shots and was a first-team All-American as the Huskies won a national championship. So while Walker has worked to establish his place in the NBA, he has a background that would suggest that you want him taking this shot.

CELEBRATION
This is the part of these Horry Scale plays I’ve tried to focus on because there are so many varying reactions. In this case, for some reason, when Walker’s shot swishes through, all the members of the Bobcats on the court calmly turn and walk away. (McRoberts is purposefully walking in the other direction well before the shot drops, like he’s late for an appointment.) Walker does seem to get mobbed by teammates eventually,  but it’s only once he’s closer to his own bench. Also, if you crank up the audio on the clip above, someone begins laughing maniacally around the 11-second mark. Not sure what that’s about but it’s a fun wrinkle.

GRADE
This probably isn’t a game with any immediate or long-term championship implications. If anything, perhaps a win like this — on the road, in overtime — will give the Bobcats a bit of a spark as they try to get to .500. Still, a defended catch-and-shoot, in overtime … when you factor it all together, I’m giving this shot three Horrys.

horry-star horry-star horry-star

What say you? How many Horrys would you give Kemba Walker’s game-winning buzzer-beater?

Bragging Rights Bracket: No. 1 Duke vs. No. 4 LSU



by Micah Hart

For the complete Bragging Rights rules and to vote for other matchups, click here. We now move to the fourth and final region, the South, with No. 1 seed Duke taking on play-in winner and 4-seed LSU, which won the battle of the bigs against Stanford to reach the Sweet 16.

VS

Duke Blue Devils

Starters (all stats per 48 minutes):

Carlos Boozer, Bulls: 27.1 points, 14.1 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 0.5 blocks, 1.0 steals
Corey Maggette, Bucks: 27.7 points, 8.3 rebounds, 2.8 assists, 0.2 blocks, 0.7 steals
Elton Brand, Sixers: 20.8 points, 11.9 rebounds, 1.9 assists, 1.6 blocks, 1.6 steals
Grant Hill, Suns: 20.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.8 assists, 0.7 blocks, 1.3 steals
Luol Deng, Bulls: 21.8 points, 7.1 rebounds, 3.4 assists, 0.7 blocks, 1.2 steals

Missed the cut: Shane Battier, Grizzlies; Chris Duhon, Magic; Mike Dunleavy, Pacers; Gerald Henderson, Bobcats; Dahntay Jones, Pacers; Josh McRoberts, Pacers; JJ Redick, Magic; Shelden Williams, Knicks

Team synopsis: People have a tendency to think that Duke players don’t do so well in the pros, but man, look at this lineup. Big and burly, and good luck keeping Brand, Boozer, and Maggette off the offensive glass. The only thing that could pose a problem for the Dookies is a lack of a top-notch outside shooter or true distributor, but Hill and Deng are good enough. Each guy on this team can put the ball in the basket.

(more…)

Josh Can’t Dunk

by Micah Hart

We referenced this a few weeks back, but the long-awaited spoof of White Men Can’t Jump featuring Josh McRoberts and Brandon Rush, made to help promote McBob’s inclusion in the dunk contest, is finally live. Check it out:

As we all know, McBob’s is not currently slated to compete in the dunk contest, but there is still a month until the event, and already one contestant has been lost to injury. I am certainly not rooting for any of the participants to get injured* — just saying, there’s still a chance Josh could see his dreams realized.

*Be careful Blake!

Either way, I applaud the creativity. There’s always next year.

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McBob prepares his media campaign for Dunk contest inclusion

by Micah Hart

You may recall a few weeks back we had Pacers PF Josh McRoberts on the Hang Time podcast to discuss his desire to be a contestant in this year’s dunk contest during All-Star Weekend in Los Angeles.

Well as much as we like to think his appearance on our podcast alone would do the trick, it appears McRoberts is going to continue to try to build more buzz for his candidacy. According to Mike Wells of the Indianapolis Star, McBob and teammate Brandon Rush have teamed up to film a scene from everyone’s favorite white-guy-playing-basketball movie, Teen Wolf White Men Can’t Jump.

Writes Wells:

McRoberts played the part of Woody Harrelson‘s character, Billy Hoyle, and Rush was Wesley Snipes‘ character, Sidney Deane.

“We’re trying to get our man Josh into the contest,” Rush said. “It was fun taking part in it. Everybody should like it.”

Apparently they filmed a version of the movie’s final scene, where the two characters are standing against a graffiti wall. Any scene from that movie is great as far as I’m concerned, but I’m a little surprised they didn’t film a re-imagining of when Hoyle bets Deane his share of their winnings that he can dunk*, only this time he comes through and slams it home with authority. But that’s just me. Everyone’s a critic.

* Every time I see this movie (and that’s a lot of times), there is still a part of me that secretly hopes that Hoyle will actually dunk the ball and not lose his share of the winnings from the Two-on-Two for Brotherhood Basketball Tournament (also known as the TTBBT). He never does though, and it somehow disappoints me every time.

Surely video of the spot will be live in the near future, and we’ll make sure to post it here.

I don’t know if McRoberts will make it to the field or not, but it’s important that he remembers that sometimes when you lose, you actually win. And sometimes when you win, you actually lose. And sometimes…I could go on all day.

Good luck Josh!

H/T Ball Don’t Lie

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Last night in…near perfection

by Micah Hart

Most people are talking this morning about last night’s instant classic between the Heat and Jazz, but we’ll get to that later on today. Hopefully though, the Pacers’ third-quarter barrage isn’t getting lost in the shuffle:

The Pacers made their first 20 (TWENTY!) shots in the quarter, and if you watch the highlight, you’ll notice it wasn’t like they were a collection of layups and dunks either. According to ESPN Stats and Information, the Pacers were 12-13 on shots from outside the paint during the period, with the lone miss coming on a Josh McRoberts (BOOO!) three in the final seconds. As a result, Indiana scored 54 points in the quarter, the most in a single period since 1990 and tied for the third highest total in NBA history.

Don’t sleep on this NBA season people — strange and wonderful things are happening every night.

UPDATE: Re-checking the box score, perhaps the funniest aspect to the period is that the Pacers, despite being incendiary from the floor, were only 6-9 from the free throw line. Tsk, tsk, tsk.

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