Posts Tagged ‘Kristaps Porzingis’

Curry, Cavaliers top NBA merchandise list

OAKLAND, CA - JUNE 19: Stephen Curry #30 of the Golden State Warriors shoots against Tristan Thompson #13 of the Cleveland Cavaliers in Game Seven of the 2016 NBA Finals on June 19, 2016 at Oracle Arena in Oakland, California. NOTE TO USER: User expressly acknowledges and agrees that, by downloading and or using this photograph, user is consenting to the terms and conditions of Getty Images License Agreement. Mandatory Copyright Notice: Copyright 2016 NBAE (Photo by Nathaniel S. Butler/NBAE via Getty Images)

ALL BALL NERVE CENTERStephen Curry may have lost in the NBA Finals, but he remains on top in at least one metric for popularity: jersey sales.

In the newest rankings of most popular NBA jerseys, based on overall sales on NBAStore.com from April through June, Curry remains in the number one spot, where he’s been since the end of the 2014-15 season. Also in the top five are Cleveland’s LeBron James, recently retired Kobe Bryant, Kyrie Irving and Klay Thompson.

Meanwhile, when it comes to team sales, fans are clearly celebrating the recent title for the Cavaliers, as Cleveland is atop the most popular team merchandise list for the first time since January 2015. The Cavs are followed by the Golden State Warriors, Los Angeles Lakers, Chicago Bulls and Oklahoma City Thunder.

Also worth noting, Andre Iguodala (No. 14) makes his debut on the jerseys list while teammate Draymond Green (No. 7) earns his highest ranking ever. Also, San Antonio’s Tim Duncan (No. 11) and Portland’s Damian Lillard (No. 13) place for the first time since June 2015 and April 2015, respectively.

Top 15 Most Popular NBA Jerseys:
1. Stephen Curry, Golden State Warriors
2. LeBron James, Cleveland Cavaliers
3. Kobe Bryant, Los Angeles Lakers
4. Kyrie Irving, Cleveland Cavaliers
5. Klay Thompson, Golden State Warriors
6. Russell Westbrook, Oklahoma City Thunder
7. Draymond Green, Golden State Warriors
8. Kevin Durant, Oklahoma City Thunder
9. Kawhi Leonard, San Antonio Spurs
10. Derrick Rose, Chicago Bulls
11. Tim Duncan, San Antonio Spurs
12. Dwyane Wade, Miami Heat
13. Damian Lillard, Portland Trail Blazers
14. Andre Iguodala, Golden State Warriors
15. Kristaps Porzingis, New York Knicks

Top 10 Most Popular Team Merchandise:
1. Cleveland Cavaliers
2. Golden State Warriors
3. Los Angeles Lakers
4. Chicago Bulls
5. Oklahoma City Thunder
6. San Antonio Spurs
7. Miami Heat
8. Toronto Raptors
9. New York Knicks
10. Boston Celtics

Kobe, Melo, Porzingis ain’t afraid of no ghosts

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — A modern reboot of the classic movie Ghostbusters is on the way, and to celebrate the new flick, last night new trailers dropped featuring several NBA players. In the first spot, set in New York City, Carmelo Anthony and Kristaps Porzingis team up with Spike Lee and Walt “Clyde” Frazier to vanquish the ghosts of Madison Square Garden. Meanwhile, in Los Angeles, who you gonna call? That’s right, Kobe Bryant.

Rookie Diary, Volume 8: Kristaps Porzingis

 

Apr 6, 2016; New York, NY, USA; New York Knicks power forward Kristaps Porzingis (6) on the sidelines during a time out during the first quarter against the Charlotte Hornets at Madison Square Garden. Mandatory Credit: Brad Penner-USA TODAY Sports

Kristaps Porzingis was forced to sit out down the stretch of his rookie season with a strained right shoulder.

Kristaps Porzingis of the Knicks and Myles Turner of the Pacers will alternate on a weekly diary for NBA.com covering life as a rookie, from challenges and success on the court to adjusting to their new world off.

This week: Porzingis discusses his 2015-16 season and plans for the summer.

I think the transition went pretty smooth. Obviously it’s different once you start playing in the NBA. There’s so much attention and everything, but I think it went pretty smooth. It was more difficult for me moving from Latvia to Spain when I was 14, 15 years old than the move now when I moved from Spain to the United States.

That’s the best feeling, that you actually feel comfortable and you feel like you belong there. I think I found that place. It took me a lot longer, for example, when I moved to Spain to feel comfortable and feel like I really wanted to be there. But here in New York, it was right from the beginning. I just felt like this is the place where I want to be for however long my career is. I really feel comfortable in New York and I hope to stay there for a long time.

As far as this season, the atmosphere with my teammates was better than I expected. I was not surprised, but it was nice to see that all of them were really good teammates and good guys that helped me out right from the beginning. Having that was really important for me, just to get adjusted to everything easier. That was one positive right from the start.

My debut was definitely a highlight. The first game. We played against Milwaukee. It was a dream come true for me to step on an NBA floor and we got the win and I had a decent game. It was really a special moment for me.

All-Star weekend was a big moment for me too. I was able to have that weekend with my family. That would be up there.

The No. 1 thing going to the next season will be me knowing what the schedule is like, how tough it is, those 82 games during the season and how well prepared you’ve got to be that schedule. That’s now one thing that I’ll be ready for.

The schedule is just way different in Europe. You play one game a week and you have the whole week to rest, you have the whole week to recover. Here it might be four games in a week. It’s a crazy schedule. That probably was the biggest adjustment for me. And the ball is a little different. The rules are a little different. There’s no three seconds in the paint on defense in Europe and they have that here. Those are the little things I had to think about at the beginning of the season to not get those called during the season.

I’m probably going to stay here in New York for the next few weeks. We have some team activities. I’m going to keep working on my shoulder to recover 100 percent. I don’t really know what to expect after that. It’s my first year. But I’ll definitely stay a while in New York. It’s like my home now basically.

For the most part I’m going to be in New York. I’ll go home with my family, back home in Latvia, and hopefully I can be really away from everything and just relax there. I’ll rest for maybe a couple weeks and get back to work. I’ll probably go to Vegas to work out. I’m not 100 percent sure about the schedule. But I’m looking forward to the offseason because this is going to be a huge offseason for me to come back next season stronger and better and help the team win.

I don’t know yet about summer league. I wouldn’t mind playing. I had fun the first time I played and if I could help out the guys with the triangle or whatever we’re doing and help out the guys and I can be there participating, I’ll be happy.

I also have to make a decision about whether to play for Latvia. I really want to play for my country and compete. I really want to represent my country this summer, but I have to be smart about this decision. I’m going to sit down, take my time, make a decision and then see what happens.

Kristaps Porzingis sings Happy Birthday to Robin Lopez

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Part of being a rookie in the NBA means having to do things for the veteran players — carrying luggage, bringing breakfast to practice, and, occasionally, singing. It was recently All Ball favorite Robin Lopez‘s birthday, and to celebrate the day in style, Knicks rookies Jerian Grant and Kristaps Porzingis were asked to give a postgame performance of “Happy Birthday.” As Porzingis says in this video captured by Kevin Seraphin, he gave it his all because that’s what he does…

Rookie Diary, Volume 7: Kristaps Porzingis


VIDEO: Porzingis discusses his Steph Curry shot and his health

Kristaps Porzingis of the Knicks and Myles Turner of the Pacers will alternate on a weekly diary for NBA.com covering life as a rookie, from challenges and success on the court to adjusting to their new world off. This week: Porzingis discusses how playing professionally in Europe before coming to the NBA gave him a unique advantage over rookies who came from college.

I’m doing a lot better physically. I was a little sick in L.A., but now I’m finally recovering to 100 percent and feeling better every day.

Emotionally it’s been tough. We had hoped to finish the road trip strong by beating Washington, but that didn’t happen, so that was frustrating, and then Sunday night we had a really tough game against Sacramento. We couldn’t really fight back and win the game. It was really frustrating to lose in front of our fans after that long road trip, but now we have two days off and we can recover mentally and physically and play well against Chicago on Wednesday.

We’re sticking together as a team, as a group. We’re trying to do the right things. We’re trying to play hard. It’s just not working out for us. During the season there has been a lot of ups and downs. It’s been a lot for us from a mental standpoint, just a lot going on. The mood isn’t as good as it was, obviously, because we’re losing now, but we’re trying to stay positive. We’re trying to fix the situation.

That’s something I’ve been through already. We had a similar situation in Spain last season. We started off really bad and then we kind of started to play better. The first of the season was a big struggle for us in Spain, so I kind of went through that already. Now it’s just the other way around. We started off playing good basketball and now we can’t find the way again. I’ve kind of been in this situation. I know what to expect. It’s just on a bigger stage.

That experience of two or three years playing professionally, the first one when I was kind of on a junior contract and not really with the first team, has definitely helped me. One thing, it’s just playing against grown men, day by day, and being there with the pressure. There’s pressure in college as well, but with the professionals it’s different. And you can be on a bad team. Most of the guys that come out of college and get drafted, they were on a good team in college and they were winning. That wasn’t my case. I think those years of experience in the ACB in Spain is really good for me now.

You never know that at the time. You’re living in the moment and whatever happens happens. But now, looking back, that obviously was good experience for me, those two years and I’m happy that I was in the situation that I was.

I never really had to think about whether to come to the United States for college and how that would have changed the way I looked at it. I had maybe two or three offers from Division II and Division III colleges, but I already had a professional contract. And those offers were not serious. They were like through Facebook. The coaches wrote me. It was funny to get those offers. I already had a professional contract. I couldn’t go to college.

When I was really young, when I didn’t have a professional contract, nobody really knew about me. Then once I started playing in the ACB, they knew my situation and they knew I wasn’t coming over. I think those two years, two and a half years, with the ACB team really helped me to develop and to see the real world, but at the same time it would have been fun to play in college and see how I do there.

I don’t know where I would have gone if I came to play in college instead of professionally in Spain. There are a lot of really good colleges, like Duke, Kentucky, Kansas. It would probably be one of those that I would like to go to. But you never know. That was never in my mind when I had the chance so I never really thought about it.

Kristaps Porzingis continues honing Steph Curry shots

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Just a few days ago we saw Knicks big man Kristaps Porzingis hitting a shot and sitting down before the ball even went in, Steph Curry-style. Well, with the Knicks in Oakland to play the Warriors tonight (10:30 p.m. EST, League Pass), I guess Porzingis figured it was as good a time as any to continue working on his Curry-inspired shots, and he attempted the same shot from the tunnel that has become a part of Curry’s pregame warmups…

Rookie Diary, Volume 6: Myles Turner


VIDEO: Turner touches on variety of topics

Myles Turner of the Pacers and Kristaps Porzingis of the Knicks will alternate on a weekly diary for NBA.com covering life as a rookie, from challenges and success on the court to adjusting to their new world off. This week: Turner discusses the pressures and emotions of stepping into a playoff race in his first season.

I definitely feel it starting to ramp up. Every game means something now. Not like it didn’t mean anything before, but it’s like every game now, especially within the Eastern Conference, can really determine how far you go. In one day you can go from sixth place all the way to like 10th.

The change is most likely coming from the coaches’ perspective, the coaches’ point of view. They’re really on us a lot more about little things, whether it’s being in certain spots on defense or picking up our intensity on offense. The coaches are on us a lot more.

It can be a little hectic just knowing that the team is depending on you to fill your role and do stuff that’s never really been asked of you in your life. It can be a little tough. But at the same time it can be fulfilling as well.

It really depends on how you look at it. My approach is I take it day by day. You can’t let it be too straining on you. But you’ve got to make sure you approach it the right way.

I think the only thing that really needs to change is the way you look at your preparation, to make sure you get as much rest as you need. It’s completely different than college when the NCAA tournament was getting close. The difference in talent on the court speaks for itself. But I think it’s different in your preparation, how the coaches view things. In March Madness it’s almost like you can make a mistake and get away with it because you’re not playing as strong of a team all the time, especially in the first round. But in the NBA, anything can happen. You’ve got to be ready for anything. You can’t really make mistakes like that because one mistake can be very detrimental.

I know without a doubt this is a personal test. Hopefully I’m in this position a lot in my career with making that playoff push. But I’m pushing myself and I’m hoping to see the results from it.

My teammates haven’t really said anything to me about what to expect. I think it’s something you have to go through by yourself. But everybody’s remaining positive with me, telling me every time I make a mistake to keep my head up, to keep working, keep learning, keep growing. Things of that nature.

The coaches haven’t necessarily told me not to get caught up in the emotions, but I’m pretty sure that’s their mindset. They might be a little nervous. But I’m pretty sure everybody’s been here before.

I think my teammates are starting to establish that trust a little bit more, but they know I’ve never been here before so it’s still a work in progress. I know I’m very confident in my abilities. I’m a very confident player.

And, yes, I’m starting to get some flashbacks as the NCAA Tournament is about to start. Unfortunately I wasn’t able to be in it very long last year – we lost in the first round – so I didn’t really get to feel that true intensity. But right now, that same mentality I had to get prepared has stayed with me.

Kristaps Porzingis channels Steph Curry

ALL BALL NERVE CENTERStephen Curry has become known this season for celebrating even before his shots go in. And as we saw earlier this week, that has started to spread to his teammates, as Andrew Bogut demonstrated. And now it may be spreading to other teams. Check out this Vine of Knicks big man Kristaps Porzingis at practice, as he sinks the shot from behind the backboard, and turns to sit down even before the ball has gone in…

https://platform.vine.co/static/scripts/embed.js

Rookie Diary, Volume 6: Kristaps Porzingis


VIDEO: Porzingis shows kids some of the finer points

Kristaps Porzingis of the Knicks and Myles Turner of the Pacers will alternate on a weekly diary for NBA.com covering life as a rookie, from challenges and success on the court to adjusting to their new world off. This week: Porzingis discusses the transition from playing in Spain with fewer games and much more practice time to the NBA with several games a week and occasional struggles to find chances to practice.

We would almost scrimmage every day in Europe. That’s how it is. And then you play once a week, on the weekends, usually on Sundays. It’s way different over here. You don’t have as much time to work on your game individually and you don’t have as much time to practice. The good thing is that you have a chance to play every other day and that helps a lot to get better. But you don’t have that much time to spend working on your individual skills.

At first, I wanted to do so much work that I would just tire myself so much that I got worn out. Now the Knicks have started to control me more and they don’t want me to practice that much. That was the thing at first. I wasted a lot of energy trying to do a lot of work and not really being smart about and not knowing what the schedule is like. Now I think I’ve gotten used to it.

Before, I would come in early, work out, then have the team practice, and then try to shoot after practice as well. There were moments some days I was just really tired. It got to me. But the team helped me out. They’re taking care of me and making sure I get enough rest. They wouldn’t say anything to me at first, but they saw that some days I was just so tired. They had to control it, what I’m doing and how much I’m shooting. Now it’s a little more controlled.

It’s a challenge to find time to get extra work without wearing yourself out. Especially when you come in in your first year and you know you’ve got to work on your game and you want to become a better player every day. For me, it’s almost anxiety that you want to work, you want to get better, you want to prove something every day. But you’ve got to be smart because the season is long, a lot of games, and you don’t want to wear yourself out before the season’s over.

I would do the work before and after the regular practice but I also like to go on those days when you don’t have a practice and get to the gym, be by myself, set up the shooting machine and just shoot and be by myself. I’ve said this in interviews before, that’s like a church to me. I go the gym and there’s no one there, you can just be working on your skills by yourself.

Usually the team is not too happy if I go too late so I try to go at normal times. Sometimes a little late – 8, 9 p.m. – but not usually later than that. I’ve tried to be there later, but the key doesn’t work. I think it stops working at 11. They want us to get rest obviously. They want us to be smart about getting rest.

I’ve talked to the assistant coaches and they’ve been telling me that they’ve seen a lot of growth in my game from the beginning of the season. I don’t see that much. I think I’ve gotten better at reading the game and what is coming. They’re seeing a lot of improvement, but I only see the weaknesses. I only see what I need to work on. I don’t really focus on what I’m doing well. The way I view things is different.

I just know there are a lot of things I see that I need to work on during the offseason. I want to keep working on my post game. I have some post moves. But I want to be the guy who you can give the ball to and know that I can score or at least draw a foul. Obviously I want to get stronger. This will be a big offseason for me to work on my strength, my mobility. I want to be a guy who can switch on guards and play defense on small guards on the perimeter. There are a lot of things I need to work on. There’s nothing I do perfect, so there’s a lot of work to do.

Rookie Diary, Volume 5: Kristaps Porzingis


VIDEO: Porzingis, Towns bask in first All-Star experience

Kristaps Porzingis of the Knicks and Myles Turner of the Pacers will alternate on a weekly diary for NBA.com covering life as a rookie, from challenges and success on the court to adjusting to their new world off. This week: Porzingis discusses his first All-Star Weekend, in Toronto as a member of the World team, coached by Spurs assistant Ettore Messina, against the United States squad in the BBVA Rising Stars Challenge.

The whole weekend was a lot of fun, even the day, Thursday, with a lot of media, a lot of interviews, a lot of pictures and stuff. I got to meet a lot of the rookies again and connect with all the internationals again, so it was a fun day. And then obviously the thing I was most excited for was the game.

I met coach Messina. He’s really big from coaching in Europe. To be on his team, that was great to learn from him a little bit and just to get a feel what type of coach he is. Just to be with the internationals, on the same team. It sucked that we didn’t get the win. That wasn’t fun. But the event was fun and I had a good time.

It was very organized obviously. But being with the Knicks is organized. Everything there was just perfect. There was a lot of security everywhere and making sure we were on time everywhere and doing the right thing. It was really a nice event, very well organized. I hope to come back next year.

I obviously want to be in the main game, the Sunday game, some day as well if that’s possible. My big dream is to be in the All-Star game. But I don’t want to look too far ahead. I just focus on this year first and then we can go day by day. If I keep growing as a player I think I will have an opportunity to be there one day.

That was my first time meeting coach Messina. All the Europeans kind of have an idea of what kind of coach he is. He’s not a typical NBA coach. He’s an elite coach that screams a lot. He’s that type of coach. I knew kind of what to expect, although obviously he knew what kind of game it was so he wasn’t really yelling at us or anything. But you can feel – I’m not sure how to say it – his presence and that he wants you to succeed and he wants 100 percent from you. He’s that type of coach. You never want to really mess around too much with him. He’s a very disciplined coach.

I think the biggest surprise for me was how well organized everything was and how they manage your time so you can be everywhere on time and at the same time you can relax a little bit and have that time with your family. Maybe not that I was surprised by it, but I was content about it went the whole weekend.

I think being there in my first year with my family there in Toronto and sharing that moment with them will be my best memory. We just hung out a lot. They were at the game. We went for lunch. We were hanging out whenever I had time off.

I arrived Thursday afternoon and left Saturday morning and went to the Bahamas for a quick vacation. But it wasn’t what I expected exactly because there was a lot of people from New York there. I couldn’t really hide because of my height. All day, basically, I was talking with the fans and taking pictures. I didn’t have the chance to relax.

But I was rested physically for sure when I went back to the Knicks. Maybe not as much mentally. But this break was really good for me and I think for the whole team as well, just to come back fresh. I definitely feel that I got some rest.