Posts Tagged ‘LaMarcus Aldridge’

Robinson Sends Rip City Into Frenzy


VIDEO: Thomas Robinson shines in his opportunity off the bench

Thomas Robinson was the No. 5 pick in the 2012 NBA Draft and is on his third NBA team. It’s safe to say his career hasn’t gotten off to the start his draft position demands. Robinson’s 11.1 minutes per game this season is filled by 4.3 points and 3.8 rebounds.

But with LaMarcus Aldridge on the mend with nagging groin pains and Kevin Love coming to town Sunday, the Blazers needed every able body on the oak to chip in.

Enter the former Jayhawk T-Rob, who played over 33 minutes against the Wolves, a season-high, and recorded 14 points and a game-high and career-high 18 rebounds. He did it in electrifying fashion, treating the Moda Center to a brand of power not often seen from their frontcourt.

In the fourth quarter with the game very much in the balance, Robinson began hawking down notorious speed demon Corey Brewer, who got loose on the break. Few foresaw the pandemonium that would follow. If we didn’t know before, we know now that the Portland faithful has no problem going insane with the right nudge:


VIDEO: Thomas Robinson obliterates Corey Brewer’s layup, leading to an oop on the other end

Batum Steals From His All-Star Teammate

Last night, the Washington Wizards got over the .500 hump for the first time in four years by beating up on the Portland Trail Blazers. Early in the contest, Nicolas Batum took the liberty to pull something that I’ve never seen done before in an NBA game.

He decided to play defense on his own teammate:


VIDEO: Nicolas Batum rips LaMarcus Aldridge during Blazers-Wizards game

Batum didn’t pilfer the pill from any co-worker. He picked arguably the game’s best power forward and three-time All-Star LaMarcus Aldridge. To his defense (odd word to use here), Batum could have been protecting the rock from a lurking Trevor Ariza, who is a known ballhawk. Or he could have just wanted the ball and was enterprising enough to take it, teammate or not.

To make matters worse, he bricked the subsequent trey ball and left a host of questions in the aftermath.

Was this his way of showcasing his displeasure of being an All-Star snub? Will this be brought up in the Blazers’ film study session? Does it technically count as a pass? Was Batum inspired by Carlton Banks? Only Batum knows.

Sometimes, defending the other team is just not enough.

Thomas Robinson Yells ‘Lunch Meat’


VIDEO: Blazers knock down 21 3-pointers in win over Bobcats

By Jonathan Hartzell, NBA.com

It’s hard to imagine any team in the NBA is having more fun this season than the Portland Trail Blazers.

They have the best record in the league at 26-7, beat their division rival in Oklahoma City to close out 2013, set an NBA-record with 21 3-pointers last night, and now they’re yelling “lunch meat.”

But why would Thomas Robinson yell “lunch meat” when LaMarcus Aldridge is in the post? Simple, according to Robinson and SB Nation blog BlazersEdge:

“Lunch meat,” Robinson explained to Blazersedge, smiling. “Whatchu do when you got some lunch meat? You eat it. Exactly! Whenever someone [is guarding Aldridge], he’s always eating. He’s L.A. Whenever somebody on him, he eat him. Lunch meat. That’s how it is.”

Fellow Blazer Myers Leonard goes on to explain:

“There’s no one that can really stop him one-on-one on the block, let alone anywhere on the court,” Leonard told Blazersedge. “L.A. is so skilled. It basically just means that L.A. is about to get a bucket. He’s eating.”

And, yes, Aldridge seems to enjoy it. But he won’t let lunch meat get to his head:

“It means the guy can’t guard me,” Aldridge sheepishly told Blazersedge. “That I’m going to score at will. It’s not that simple when I’m doing it. They say it looks that easy sometimes. It’s fine, but I’m not going to get into it, I’m not going to say it myself.”

One thing worth noting, though: Aldridge is shooting 40.2 percent from the post this season, according to Synergy Sports.

Still, Aldridge has the perfect attitude to have towards lunch meat. Enjoy it, but don’t let it consume you.

(h/t BlazersEdge)

Local Ads: LaMarcus Aldridge and Robin Lopez Want To Sell You A Car

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — We love local ads here at the All Ball blog, and this latest spot from Portland starring LaMarcus Aldridge and Robin Lopez is indicative of all the reasons why. First of all, the acting chops are nothing short of…well, hey, at least they’re trying. The music, strangely, is the same music as in the epic Norman/OKC Thunder commercial from two years ago. And the final shot where Aldridge and Lopez stand back-to-back and gingerly swivel toward the camera is just sublime…
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VIDEO: Lopez and Aldridge local ad

And as a bonus: Bloopers. Because everyone loves bloopers…


VIDEO: Lopez and Aldridge bloopers

(via TNLP)

Horry Scale: Monta Is Money


VIDEO: Monta Ellis GWBB

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — I can not tell a lie: It has been a season of highs and lows here at Horry Scale Central. We began the season with three Game-Winning Buzzer-Beaters within seven days, a flurry of activity to make even the most jaded NBA watcher’s head twirl. This required me to write three Horry Scale posts in succession, which turned out to be a controversial endeavor. Folks weren’t happy with my rating of the Jeff Green GWBB, which kept me up very late at night, triggering some difficult and genuine soul searching, at least as far as you know. Since then I have perhaps tried to overcorrect with some of my other ratings, a maneuver that has in no small part generated its own share of controversy, and which has caused something of an existential Horry Scale crisis.

But I digress. Before we get too far into this, we should stop and explain: What is the Horry Scale? For those who are new around these parts, the Horry Scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

With the rules in place, Today we turn our tired eyes to the lovely Pacific Northwest. Let’s check out last night’s game-winner from Monta Ellis

DIFFICULTY
Monta Ellis has made tougher shots in his career, probably even in this game. This was basically a catch-and-shoot on a curl coming around a screen, a shot Ellis has taken thousands of times in his life. And Ellis made a clean catch, swung around the screen, and had a wide open look at the basket. And yes, he drained the shot, so kudos to him. To me the most interesting thing on this play was that the Blazers did not switch defenders on the screen. In the NBA, for the most part defenders always switch on picks in the last few seconds of a game, and particularly on an inbounds play. This is not only easy for the players on the floor to remember, in a more general sense it means defenders are always running at the ball when there are only seconds to play. But as Ellis came around the series of screens, Portland’s Wesley Matthews tried to stay with him, with no real help waiting for him. (As my main man Ben Golliver reports on Blazers Edge, Portland had decided before the play to only switch guard-on-guard screens. Dallas’ other guard on the floor was Jose Calderon, who was inbounding the ball, so the Blazers all knew there would effectively be no switching.) By the time Ellis caught the pass, curled around the pick from DaJuan Blair and popped free at the top of the key, Portland’s best defensive option may have been LaMarcus Aldridge, who was flat-footed about six feet away from Ellis. Matthews made a last-second swipe at the ball from behind while trying to recover, but he couldn’t make a difference.

GAME SITUATION
What you don’t see in the clip above is the clutch three-pointer Lillard made to tie the game with 1.9 seconds remaining. That play was set up by a Dallas turnover from, you guessed it, Monta Ellis. So in many ways this GWBB was about redemption for Monta. Still, once Dallas got the ball with the game tied, it seemed like it would probably be Dirk Nowitzki time, right? Even in the video above, as the Mavs line up for the play, you can hear Portland analyst Mike Rice note, “Watch [DaJuan] Blair set a pick for either Vince Carter or Dirk.” So Dallas coach Rick Carlisle using the situation to run a play for Ellis was not only in retrospect a wise choice, it was crafty, as well.

IMPORTANCE
This was big on both sides. The Blazers had been riding a four-game winning streak, and had amassed eight straight wins at home. The crowd in Portland, which is always among the best in sports, was rowdy and sold out, twenty-thousand strong. The Mavs, meanwhile, after an offseason that was quieter than most expected, have been something of a mild surprise this season, bobbing along a couple of games above .500. Any road win in the NBA is a good thing, but a road win over the best team in the Conference is always a great thing.

CELEBRATION
The Mavs seemed really fired up by Ellis’ shot, surrounding him and grabbing him. Also, I’m pretty sure someone ran off the Dallas bench and hit Ellis with a large cushion at about the 19-second mark of the video. I particularly enjoyed this facet of the celebration: The cushion bash needs to become a regular part of post-shot celebrations.

If nothing else, Mavs owner Mark Cuban was jacked up about it…

GRADE
I think we can all agree that the degree of difficulty wasn’t through the roof, at least just as a jump shot, in a bubble. But all the other parts of this play — Ellis’ earlier turnover, Lillard’s game-tying three moments earlier, Portland’s home win streak, Dallas’ execution on the final play — give added weight to the play. This is one of those situations where I wish we had half-Horrys to award, because I really feel like this is a 3.5 Horry Play. Should I round up or down? That’s another discussion for another day. In this case, I’m going with four Horrys, because for me the post-shot cushion bash lifts it from three to four…

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That’s my take. How many Horry’s would you give the Monta Ellis game-winner?

NBA Behind The Scenes: The Photo Game (Part Two)

FOR PART ONE, CLICK HERE

BROOKLYN Earlier this week, I spent an evening shadowing Nathaniel Butler from NBA Photos as he photographed the Trail Blazers-Nets game in Brooklyn. During the game, Butler gave me a camera and let me shoot the action. What follows are some of the images I took that night, with my thoughts and comments below each picture. These pictures have not been cropped or color-corrected or anything else. This is what I shot … for better, or for, probably mostly, worse.

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As the Blazers took the floor to warm up directly in front of me, Nic Batum started hoisting 15-footers from the right wing. I picked up my camera, zoomed in a bit, half-pushed the button down to make sure the image was focused, and then fired off the shot. What I didn’t account for was that Batum would jump when he shot, so my photo chopped off his arms and the ball.

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Once the game started, sure enough the Nets ran a play to get Kevin Garnett a shot at the top of the key. I saw the play developing and as soon as KG caught the ball and squared up, I took this picture. Unfortunately, as you may notice, I managed to capture all of the players out of focus. But the basket support and the fans in the front rows are crystal clear. Also, terrific job by me to cut off the shot clock. (more…)

NBA Behind The Scenes: The Photo Game (Part One)

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(Editor’s Note: While we cover the NBA as obsessively as we can around here, there are still numerous ancillary parts of the game experience that we want to uncover and explore. Being involved with the NBA can mean everything from serving up exotic foods to firing shirts into the crowd. We will delve into these angles of the NBA as part of a new regular (and perhaps a bit irregular) All Ball series, NBA Behind The Scenes.)

BROOKLYN – It was 3:30 on Monday afternoon in Brooklyn, four hours before the Brooklyn Nets would play host to the Portland Trail Blazers. The interior hallways of the Barclays Center were mostly deserted, save for a few food service employees firing up ovens and custodial staff giving the place a final shine before thousands of fans arrived. Out on the arena floor, a rec league championship game was taking place.

Sitting in a folding chair just below one of the baskets was a man in a black polo shirt and jeans, working at a determined pace. He wasn’t tall, wasn’t short, and his blond hair made determining his age require more than a glance. He tore black gaffers tape into strips and secured loose wires that were splayed all over the place — to the basket support, from the basket support, along the cement arena floor, on the edge of the court. Three large hard plastic containers were open on the floor around him, all neatly packed with lenses, cameras, tripods and various other equipment. A hand truck was just behind, waiting to be loaded up and rolled away.

The man’s assistant turned up, carrying several camera batteries, which were checked and rechecked, and some were swapped out for more potent options. Words like “reflectors” and “overheads” were used casually between the two men in conversation. A ladder was propped up under a backboard, and a multi-thousand dollar camera was affixed to the glass and carefully aimed out toward the paint.

I had come to Brooklyn to meet up with Nathaniel S. Butler, who is a photographer for NBA Photos, and has been chronicling the NBA in pictures for about two decades now. You may not know Nat Butler’s name, but if you’re an NBA fan, you almost definitely know his work. Like perhaps this image …

John Starks drives hard for a slam dunk

(more…)

Horry Scale: Aldridge Drops Mavs (Again)

by Jeff Case
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If it seems like the Horry Scale has weighed the Blazers more than few times since we started this venture back in 2010, it’s not that far off. By our count, Portland has been on the Horry Scale — either as the Horry-er (aka the shot-maker) or as the Horry-ee (aka the victim) — three times, including once this season, entering Tuesday’s action. The Blazers’ mark in those Horry situations? They’re 2-1 … but let’s make that 3-1 after LaMarcus Aldridge went to a reliable Horry shot to sink his hometown Mavs.

If Aldridge’s game-winner last night that you see above looks an awful lot like another recent Horry shot from him, you’ve got a sharp memory. Just a little more than a year ago, Aldridge victimized the Mavs in Dallas with a fadeaway jumper at the horn over Brendan Haywood. Haywood has since moved on to Charlotte, but that didn’t stop Aldridge from victimizing another Mav (with a similar-sounding first name), Brandan Wright, with a nearly identical shot.

(Props to our crack multimedia crew at the NBA Digital empire for cranking out this great look at Aldridge’s last two Horry shots).

Of course, it takes a team effort to set the stage for a shot like Aldridge’s and the Blazers needed everyone’s effort on Tuesday to get into a spot where they could win this game. The Mavs essentially had the Blazers finished after building a 69-48 lead off O.J. Mayo‘s stepback 3-pointer with 8 minutes, 37 seconds left. By late in the fourth quarter rolled, though, we had a lead-changing frenzy.

For those that are new around these parts, the Horry scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

How does Aldridge’s shot Tuesday night stack up? Let’s dive in …

Difficulty

At times to the chagrin of Blazer fans, Aldridge has made his All-Star bones as a perimeter shooter, so it’s fitting he’d favor that shot to clinch a victory. Shot selection is key when there’s 1.5 seconds to go, so kudos to coach Terry Stotts for putting Aldridge in position to succeed. Much like his shot against the Mavs in 2012, Aldridge sets up on the low post. Unlike against Dallas, though, Aldridge knows he doesn’t have time to move out to the perimeter, catch the ball and take two dribbles to set up his shot. So he gets position on Wright, receives the ball from inbounder Wesley Matthews, turns … fades … and that’s the ballgame.

For Dallas, Mayo provides token pressure on the inbounds, Vince Carter stays at home with Nicolas Batum on the left baseline, making this a one-on-one situation for Aldridge. Darren Collison appears to try and help Wright from underneath, but he can’t get there in time.

Overall, this is an All-Star-vs.-rotation-player situation, and not surprisingly, the All-Star gets what he wants. Wright defends it pretty well, but Aldridge knows what he’s doing here.

Game Situation

Tie ballgame between two low-to-mid-level West teams … not a shocker, right? Wrong. As we mentioned, the Blazers were down 21 in the third and looked cooked. Portland’s bench won’t win any productivity awards this season, but without those reserves, the Blazers wouldn’t have won. Big contributions from Sasha Pavlovic and Ronnie Price in the fourth quarter kept the Blazers ahead or tied with the Mavs down the stretch. No play was perhaps bigger for that crew than Price drawing a charge on Mayo with 1.5 seconds left.

The Mavs weren’t without their own displays of clutch-itude, what with Collison banking in a wacky 3-pointer with 3:01 left and Dirk Nowitzki draining what at the time seemed to be a back-breaking 3-pointer with 11.9 seconds left to give Dallas a 104-101 lead.

Aldridge, being the hero he was this night, answered Nowitzki’s 3-pointer with one of his own with 4.9 seconds left, setting up Price’s defensive stand and Aldridge’s game-winner.

Importance

Portland is still trying to stay in the West playoff race and this one helps the cause, pulling them within a game of eighth-seeded Houston.

For Dallas, it is another rough loss in a season filled with them — the Mavs are now 2-5 in games decided by three points or less (Portland is 8-3 in such games).

One win can never make up for a loss elsewhere, but no doubt this one had to lessen the sting of the last Horry moment at the Rose Garden — Washington’s Jordan Crawford draining a 3-pointer at the horn to drop Portland just eight days ago.

Celebration

Teammates Nicolas Batum (a Horry Scale inductee himself in 2011) said Aldridge was “smiling like a rookie” after hitting his shot. Aldridge, who starred at the University of Texas and Dallas-area high school Seagoville, simply turns and looks at the Mavs’ bench a little before laughing, smiling and walking up court. Matthews chest bumps him first before everyone short of ex-Blazer James “Hollywood” Robinson comes running toward him from the Blazers’ bench to celebrate.

There’s one last huddle up and then the Blazers head out to the locker room.

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Grade

4 Horrys. Tough shot for most players, but pretty routine for Aldridge. This one kind of ranks up there in importance with the J.R. Smith shot against the Bobcats earlier this season in that the defense gave a standout player just the kind of shot he wanted.  Overall, it should be three stars. But I give it that extra star bump for the clutch-iness of Aldridge in not just nailing the game-winner, but also the game-tying shot, too. If that’s not the sort of thing Horry used to do, I don’t know what is.

What sayeth you?

LaMarcus Aldridge, How Does Your Head Feel?

by Zettler Clay IV

Signed, Byron Mullens:


A Look Back: Best Horry Scale Moments From 2011-12

by Micah Hart

This was pretty fun — joined the GameTime pregame show before Wednesday night’s games to break down the season’s best Horry Scale moments, with the scale’s patron saint himself there to critique my grades:



The prevailing thought amongst Robert Horry, Kevin Martin, and Dennis Scott was that I judged too harshly this season, which is amusing because most emails I received from the fans seemed to suggest I was too lenient. Guess you can’t please everyone!

Here is my final ranking of this year’s six Horry Scale recipients – how would you rank them?

6. Derrick Rose beats Milwaukee – This low because I hate seeing a PG of his caliber settle for a long jumper.
5. Luke Ridnour beats Utah – Difficult floater, but no resistance from the Jazz defense.
4. LaMarcus Aldridge beats Dallas – Aldridge sure does make this look easy.
3. Luol Deng beats Toronto – Only tip-in of the season, Bulls trailed by 1.
2. Kevin Love beats L.A. Clippers – Perhaps in hindsight should have graded higher, especially coming in in the city where he played his college ball.
1. Kevin Durant beats Dallas – Set the bar high the first week of the season and was never topped. The ball barely touches the net from almost 30 feet!

Agree? Disagree? Let us know in the comments.

UPDATE: A reminder folks, the shot has to beat the buzzer to be considered. As great as Jeremy Lin’s shot to beat the Raptors was, there were still tenths of a second left on the clock. Doesn’t qualify. A man’s gotta have a code…

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