Posts Tagged ‘Vince Carter’

Vince Carter can still fly

ALL BALL NERVE CENTERVince Carter is 38 years old, at age by which most athletes are slowing down and staying a little closer to the ground than they were earlier in their careers. But Vince has always been known as “Half Man, Half Amazing,” and maybe the amazing half is still there, even if Vince doesn’t show it off quite as often. Here’s a few pictures from a workout this summer at the P3 Sports Science facility in California, and proof that Vince can still get up, even when you compare him to some of his (much younger) contemporaries…

Vince Carter apologizes to Frederic Weis

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Fifteen years ago today, at the Sydney Summer Olympics, during a men’s basketball game between the United States and France, Vince Carter did something pretty spectacular: He jumped completely over seven-footer Frederic Weis and dunked the ball. It was, arguably but quite possibly, the greatest in-game slam dunk of all-time.

VIDEO: Carter dunks on Weis

And now, fifteen years later, in an interview on TrueHoopTV, when asked what he would say to Frederic Weis, Carter apologizes…

You can watch the full interview here and there’s a great oral history about the dunk here, too.

Have to say, still seems like yesterday to some of us.

Comparing Zach LaVine and Vince Carter

VIDEO: Dunk recap

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — One of the greatest dunk contest performances of all-time was in Oakland in 2000, when Vince Carter unleashed epic dunk after epic dunk. And while dunk contests since then have been up-and-down, this year Minnesota rookie Zach LaVine turned in another dunk contest for the ages. In fact, LaVine has drawn comparisons to Carter, and as this Vine from the NBA shows, there certainly are some similarities…

(Vine via TNLP)

Backboard déjà vu

VIDEO: Gerald Green does it for self

We’ve seen Tracy McGrady put his creativity to use. Many times.

Vince Carter took it to another level.

Dwight Howard even added his own Superman touch to it.

And now, once again, Dunk HQ legend Gerald Green is writing a new chapter in the “Do It Yourself”, pass-off-the-backboard-for-a-slam manual.

This spur-of-the-moment play is nothing new for Green, who stunned the Blazers last season with something similar. This time, it’s the Magic who are the victim of Green’s “make a way out of no way” thought process.

Let the scouting report show: it’s probably best if opponents don’t let Green step through and around them at the right elbow.

Horry Scale: Lee saves Grizzlies

VIDEO: Courtney Lee reverses a lay-in off an inbounds pass at the buzzer to defeat the Kings

Courtney Lee’s mental clock must tick smooth like a Rolex … a real one!

Because the Memphis Grizzlies swingman didn’t miss a beat with his buzzer-beating heroics in his team’s epic 111-110 comeback win over the Sacramento Kings Thursday night at the FedEx Forum.

Lee’s beautifully-timed work not only secured the Grizzlies’ rally from a 22-point first quarter deficit that sent fans onto Beale Street feeling giddy about their Grizzlies, it also landed him a prime position on the Horry Scale.

Welcome, Courtney Lee, to the pantheon of clutch shot-makers who have helped make the modern highlight (and the game-winning bucket) the staple it has become in our daily sports diet.

Around here, such plays are evaluated according to difficulty, game situation, importance and celebration. Then they get an overall grade, represented with 1-5 Robert Horry stars, in honor of the vagabond marksman who helped the Rockets (two), Lakers (three) and Spurs (two) capture seven titles in his years with them.

Again, the Horry Scale does not measure only a game-winning shot; the Horry Scale measures several facets of a GWBB. So we’re talking about not only the shot, but also the play that creates the shot, the situation and the drama, the celebrations … basically, the total package


Catch and shoot. It was the only option with so little time (:00.3 to be exact) on the clock. Well, try catching it under the basket and getting a reverse layup to go in over your head with the game on the line. It helped that the Kings fell for each and every jab step and head fake from each and every Grizzlies player, thus freeing Lee up to get to his spot unabated for the game-winning shot attempt.The catch and shoot part of it all was on Lee, and that was plenty difficult, considering the body contortion necessary tor completion of the play. The getting there, however, was courtesy of the Kings … who are clearly in a giving mood this week. This was their second straight come-from-ahead-loss of the week. They led Dallas by 18 points after the first quarter Tuesday and wound up losing 106-98. They are the first team in NBA history to lose back-to-back games that they led by 18 or more points in the first quarter.


Perhaps everyone was still in shock that the Grizzlies had come all the way back. How else do you explain them having those precious .3 seconds to work with on a do-or-die shot? If Vince Carter’s pass is off every so slightly, it’s game over. If a defender knocks Lee off course as he makes his break to the basket, there’s no way he gets his hands on the ball and gets that shot off in time. The play worked in real time exactly the way Grizzlies coach Dave Joerger scribbled it up on the whiteboard in the huddle. Marc Gasol set the perfect screen on Darren Collison. When Jason Thompson and Collison crashed into each other trying to recover, it was already too late. Lee gathered himself and was in the air with his arms outstretched. He grabbed the ball and kissed it off the glass all in the same motion. Game over.


For a Grizzlies team trying to stay atop of and set the pace in the Western Conference standings, stealing this game was huge. No team with designs on a top four seed in the playoff chase can afford to let a game like this slip away. Coming all the way back and not finishing the deal would have been a crusher.


It’s hard to tell if the look of disbelief on Lee’s face was based on his acrobatic layup going in ahead of the final buzzer or because he got completely wide open on the play. The crowd, already on its feet, went bonkers as the ball went off the glass and through the net. Lee made the rounds from the corner of the floor all the way to the Grizzlies bench, hopping in and out of the arms of his teammates along the way. It wasn’t the nifty leap onto the the scorers table we saw from Lance Stephenson. Lee had to get to the bench and watch the review on the jumbotron. He and Tayshaun Prince looked skyward and Lee raised both hands like a boxer who had just heard his name called as the winner.


Courtney Lee is an unlikely hero on a Grizzlies team with several more high-profile options. It’s a testament to this Grizzlies team that no one minds sharing the glory. It could have just as easily been Tony Allen or even Zach Randolph on the receiving end of that pass from Carter…

Given the early deficit, the comeback and the extreme degree of difficulty on that final play, the catch and the kiss … off the glass, it’s hard to give anything high marks to Lee and the Grizzlies for a game-winning play that makes its namesake proud. Give it four Horrys.
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Throwback Thursday: All-Time Best Nets

VIDEO: The Nets paid tribute to Jason Kidd’s career last season

Welcome to Throwback Thursday here on the All Ball Blog. Each week, we’ll delve into the NBA’s photo archives and uncover a topic and some great images from way back when. Hit us up here if you have suggestions for a future TBT on All Ball. Suggestions are always welcome!

Today’s Topic: All-Time Best Nets

On this date in 1967, The New Jersey Americans, a new ABA franchise sold to Arthur Brown, played its first game.

In the 1968-69 season, the Americans became the New York Nets — a name the team would keep throughout its ABA days and when it joined the NBA before the 1976-77 season. In 1977-78, they moved to New Jersey and became the New Jersey Nets, a name the franchise would keep until it moved, again, in 2012-13 to Brooklyn and became the Brooklyn Nets.

The franchise has a championship history, having won ABA titles in 1974 and ’76, and made back-to-back NBA Finals in the early 2000s (2002, ’03) as well.

To honor the Nets franchise, we take this Throwback Thursday to look back at the best players to ever suit up for the team.

(NOTE: Click the “caption” icon below the photo for details about each moment.)

Gallery: Throwback Thursday: All-Time Best Nets

Who’s your favorite player in the history of the Nets? Leave your comments below!

Throwback Thursday: All-time best Raptors

VIDEO: NB90s looks back on Vince Carter’s glory days in Toronto

Welcome to Throwback Thursday here on the All Ball Blog. Each week, we’ll delve into the NBA’s photo archives and uncover a topic and some great images from way back when. Hit us up here if you have suggestions for a future TBT on All Ball.

Today’s Topic: The top Raptors of all-time


On May 22, 1994, Toronto was scheduled to enter the NBA as an expansion franchise for the 1995-96 season. It was on that day that the team’s nickname, the Raptors, was unveiled and an NBA team was fully realized. Today, we look back on the greatest players to ever suit up for the Raptors, from the early days in the “dino” jerseys to the current group this season that took home the Atlantic Division title and set a franchise record for wins.

(NOTE: Click the “caption” icon below the photo for details about each moment.)

Gallery: TBT: Top Raptors of all-time

What do you most remember about the Raptors? Leave your comments below!

Mark Cuban shows off outside touch

By Lang Whitaker,

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — The next time the Dallas Mavericks need someone to knock down an outside jumper, it seems they may have a new option to explore. (Other than Vince Carter.) Check out this Instagram video from a Dallas-based recording artist who was courtside long enough to catch Mavs owner Mark Cuban drilling perimeter jumpers. You gotta chase him off that line!

(via TNLP)

Horry Scale: Vince’s victory

By Lang Whitaker,


ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — Last week we looked at the regular-season Horry Scale in full. Now, with the playoffs in full swing, it took just at a week to have our first postseason Horry Scale entry.

What is the Horry Scale? For those who are new around these parts, the Horry Scale examines a game-winning buzzer-beater (GWBB) in the categories of difficulty, game situation (was the team tied or behind at the time?), importance (playoff game or garden-variety Kings-Pistons game?) and celebration (is it over the top or too chill? Just the right panache or needs more sauce?). Then we give it an overall grade on a scale of 1-5 Robert Horrys, the patron saint of last-second daggers.

One thing I’d like to clear up: The Horry Scale does not measure only a game-winning shot; the Horry Scale measures several facets of a Game-Winning Buzzer-Beater. So we’re talking about not only the shot, but also the play that creates the shot, the situation and the drama, the celebrations … basically, everything surrounding and including the shot. So when I gave Randy Foye a 3 Horry rating, that wasn’t only a reflection of his shot, which was admittedly remarkable, as I wrote, but also the play, which was awful. Taj Gibson’s lefty layup wasn’t the toughest shot, but that inbounds play was terrific. Basically, everything matters.

Counting the regular season, this gives us a record-setting 18 Horry Scale entries this season. Let’s take a closer look at Vince Carter‘s game-winning three in Game 3 against San Antonio from earlier today…

The corner three-pointer is supposedly the “easiest” three-pointer. Which doesn’t mean it’s easy, obviously. But it is a shorter shot than a straight-away or wing three. But what if you’re shooting from the corner and you’re fading away? And what if you’re covered as tightly as a smedium shirt by Manu Ginobili, with inches to get the shot off?

And what if you have less than 2 seconds left to release the shot? Well, add all those factors together and you’ve got a nearly impossible shot. Thing is, nobody told Vince Carter.

PLAYOFFS! PLAYOFFS! The pressure doesn’t get any higher than in the postseason. As for the play itself, Dallas had the ball down two, after Ginobili scored on the other end to give San Antonio the lead. You’d think Dallas might go either Dirk or Monta, both of whom have made visits to the Horry Scale this season. You would, however, be wrong. Because, of course, the Mavs went to Vince Carter instead…

To get Vince open on the inbound play, the Mavs stacked up Vince, Dirk and Brandan Wright, then ran Monta Ellis off the triple screen. As Ellis popped free at the top, Vince ducked to the corner, caught, spun and drained the shot. Good defense from Manu, better shot by Vince. Catch, spin, shot, bottom. Win.

Probably the best all-around celebration of the season. This is partially a function of it happening in the playoffs, when the intensity is already ratcheted up high. When the shot went through, the American Airlines Center went crazy. The Mavs all surrounded Vince and celebrated with him. Two other things that we should note? Right in the center of the Mavs celebration was owner Mark Cuban

Screen Shot 2014-04-26 at 7.51.09 PM

Hey, if I owned an NBA team and we won a playoff game on a last-second shot, I’d be up in that celebration, too.

Also, as the Mavs celebrated, we got a quick glimpse at stoic Popovich

Screen Shot 2014-04-26 at 7.51.32 PM


This is when it all counts. Heckuva situation, heckuva shot. As far as a grade, this one really had it all. I was thinking somewhere between 4 and 5 Horrys. And you know what? We’re going with 5 Horrys for this one, our first five Horry shot of the season…


Now it’s your turn! How many Horrys would you give Vince Carter’s shot?

JR Smith Moves On From Shoelaces To Headbands

ALL BALL NERVE CENTER — A few weeks back, Knicks guard J.R. Smith was caught with his hand in the proverbial cookie jar, as he distracted a few opponents by untying their shoes. Last night against the Mavs, Smith unveiled a new diversionary tactic versus Vince Carter

VIDEO: JR Goes For The Headband